Writing—Inspiration: Science Fiction Based Rhetoric

29 September 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m on the tarmac at home station.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Here is the breakdown of my reader’s question(s):

 

  • Explain to your readership how you define, identify, develop and present rhetorical situations in your novels.

 

  1. Present a framework for rhetorical situations, as well as tricks, traps and techniques, with examples.
  2. Employ Aristotle’s (5) elements of rhetoric: Logos Ethos, Pathos, Telos and Kairos, to provide writer’s advice.
  3. Use this approach to provide elements of rhetoric, and good speech writing for use in a debate club.

 

This is the basic form of a logical argument in philosophical logic.

  1. Definitions
  2. Assumptions
  3. Argument
  4. Conclusions

 

From my standpoint, logic is the beginning of everything—philosophical logic. Also, from my standpoint, I don’t wish to interject my viewpoints on my readers. I wish to interject my characters viewpoints on my readers. These are very important concepts.

 

Logic in the written word (rhetoric) is also a function of science fiction. In science fiction, the author is creating a science-based fiction world that is logical and real in the context of the writing. This is pure rhetoric in my opinion. The science fiction author takes elements of the known world and extrapolates in terms of science and logic to produce an entirely constructed reality that seems real to the reader. This is a pure use of rhetoric. The successful science fiction author produces a suspension of reality such that the reader actually seems like he is in the future world. This is true of all fiction, but we’ll move there slowly. Science fiction is the epitome of the use of rhetoric to produce a “real” world that can be significantly different than the world of our general experience. This is why I started with it as an example. The trick is the suspension of reality. This is the goal of all writing, but is easiest to see in science fiction. I’ll begin with this to lay down a foundation for rhetoric in writing.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—Inspiration: Science Fiction and Modern Based Rhetoric

28 September 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m on the tarmac at home station.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Here is the breakdown of my reader’s question(s):

 

  • Explain to your readership how you define, identify, develop and present rhetorical situations in your novels.

 

  1. Present a framework for rhetorical situations, as well as tricks, traps and techniques, with examples.
  2. Employ Aristotle’s (5) elements of rhetoric: Logos Ethos, Pathos, Telos and Kairos, to provide writer’s advice.
  3. Use this approach to provide elements of rhetoric, and good speech writing for use in a debate club.

 

This is the basic form of a logical argument in philosophical logic.

  1. Definitions
  2. Assumptions
  3. Argument
  4. Conclusions

 

From my standpoint, logic is the beginning of everything—philosophical logic. Also, from my standpoint, I don’t wish to interject my viewpoints on my readers. I wish to interject my characters viewpoints on my readers. These are very important concepts.

 

Placing the “real” world in your fiction is the root of rhetorical writing. I examined how I do this for historical fiction, but I do the same for modern and science fiction. Let’s look at science fiction first. Every science fiction world is or should be based in logic. Logic makes all fiction “real.” Think about it, fantasy, historical, modern, and science fiction worlds all follow certain laws. Those laws are either real or they are designed by the author. For example, the laws of magic. The laws of magic are an artificial construct (except to those who believe in real magic). You can study what many believe are the rules or laws of magic. You can base a fantasy novel on the laws of magic or other laws of magic you invent. The trick is to develop laws of magic that make sense logically to your readers. I personally just use the classical laws of magic for magic in a novel, but you can make up your own laws of magic. The same is true for a science fiction world.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—Inspiration: Scene Based Rhetoric

27 September 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m on the tarmac at home station.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Here is the breakdown of my reader’s question(s):

 

  • Explain to your readership how you define, identify, develop and present rhetorical situations in your novels.

 

  1. Present a framework for rhetorical situations, as well as tricks, traps and techniques, with examples.
  2. Employ Aristotle’s (5) elements of rhetoric: Logos Ethos, Pathos, Telos and Kairos, to provide writer’s advice.
  3. Use this approach to provide elements of rhetoric, and good speech writing for use in a debate club.

 

This is the basic form of a logical argument in philosophical logic.

  1. Definitions
  2. Assumptions
  3. Argument
  4. Conclusions

 

From my standpoint, logic is the beginning of everything—philosophical logic. Also, from my standpoint, I don’t wish to interject my viewpoints on my readers. I wish to interject my characters viewpoints on my readers. These are very important concepts.

 

I would argue that all the situations (actions and conversations) in my novels (scenes) are based in logic (philosophical arguments) that are rhetorical (philosophical arguments in written words). If you look at the statement just above, my purpose (as a part of entertainment) is to interject my characters’ ideas on my readers. This is a concept lost on my inexperienced writers. The bright-eyed student innocently states: I want to tell the world what I think and know. The experienced writer and thinker will eruditely express: the world doesn’t care what you think, and most people know much more than you do. This is an absolution truth that is lost on the youth. This is why I don’t write history books or papers even though I have a great knowledge of history. Many people might read my historical novels and be entertained. They get free history. Few would read my historical papers and fewer would be entertained. My writing would go to waste. I can place the real historical world in my historical fiction that many will read and enjoy. This is the root of fictional rhetoric. You can do the same with modern works or science fiction.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—Inspiration: the Rhetorical Approach

26 September 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m on the tarmac at home station.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Here is the breakdown of my reader’s question(s):

 

  • Explain to your readership how you define, identify, develop and present rhetorical situations in your novels.

 

  1. Present a framework for rhetorical situations, as well as tricks, traps and techniques, with examples.
  2. Employ Aristotle’s (5) elements of rhetoric: Logos Ethos, Pathos, Telos and Kairos, to provide writer’s advice.
  3. Use this approach to provide elements of rhetoric, and good speech writing for use in a debate club.

 

This is the basic form of a logical argument in philosophical logic.

  1. Definitions
  2. Assumptions
  3. Argument
  4. Conclusions

 

From my standpoint, logic is the beginning of everything—philosophical logic. Also, from my standpoint, I don’t wish to interject my viewpoints on my readers. I wish to interject my characters viewpoints on my readers. These are very important concepts.

 

What does it mean to approach a novel as a philosophical construct? First, it must be entertaining. If you have read any of my novels, you know I aim first to entertain. My second point is to present a view of reality. This view is a rhetorical view—it is a philosophical view based on language, and therefore, rhetoric. Third, the novel fits the rules for a novel—see above. These basic rules or the outline for a novel fits into the construct of a logical argument (a philosophical or a rhetorical argument). Note, the initial scene sets the definitions and the assumptions. The rising action is the argument. The climax and following is the resolution and conclusion of the argument. The reasoning behind this approach is to provide a framework for writing a novel—this is a logic framework. It is also a rhetorical framework. It is not a great leap from an overall logical (rhetorical) approach to a scene-based rhetorical (logical) approach.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—Inspiration: Rhetoric is not a Pejorative

25 September 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m on the tarmac at home station.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Here is the breakdown of my reader’s question(s):

 

  • Explain to your readership how you define, identify, develop and present rhetorical situations in your novels.

 

  1. Present a framework for rhetorical situations, as well as tricks, traps and techniques, with examples.
  2. Employ Aristotle’s (5) elements of rhetoric: Logos Ethos, Pathos, Telos and Kairos, to provide writer’s advice.
  3. Use this approach to provide elements of rhetoric, and good speech writing for use in a debate club.

 

This is the basic form of a logical argument in philosophical logic.

  1. Definitions
  2. Assumptions
  3. Argument
  4. Conclusions

 

From my standpoint, logic is the beginning of everything—philosophical logic. Also, from my standpoint, I don’t wish to interject my viewpoints on my readers. I wish to interject my characters viewpoints on my readers. These are very important concepts.

 

Conceptually a novel is a philosophical document. The philosophical proof is the theme. The problem is the resolution of the telic flaw. The setting and characters are the definitions and assumptions. The conclusion is the climax resolution. Very simply, in my opinion, the author is in the business of philosophy. In literature, we call philosophy rhetoric. Rhetoric is applied correctly as the use of words to make a philosophical proof. Rhetoric is not necessarily a pejorative. In modern thought, rhetoric has come to mean sophistry or the use of language to obscure truth. By definition, in classical term, rhetoric is the use of language to determine truth. It is the use of philosophical argument in words to prove a truth or at least an idea. This is how I understand and use rhetoric. To me although the purpose of a novel is to entertain, the mode of entertainment is philosophy or in these terms, rhetoric.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—Inspiration: still more about Rhetoric

24 September 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m on the tarmac at home station.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Here is the breakdown of my reader’s question(s):

 

  • Explain to your readership how you define, identify, develop and present rhetorical situations in your novels.

 

  1. Present a framework for rhetorical situations, as well as tricks, traps and techniques, with examples.
  2. Employ Aristotle’s (5) elements of rhetoric: Logos Ethos, Pathos, Telos and Kairos, to provide writer’s advice.
  3. Use this approach to provide elements of rhetoric, and good speech writing for use in a debate club.

 

This is the basic form of a logical argument in philosophical logic.

  1. Definitions
  2. Assumptions
  3. Argument
  4. Conclusions

 

From my standpoint, logic is the beginning of everything—philosophical logic. Also, from my standpoint, I don’t wish to interject my viewpoints on my readers. I wish to interject my characters viewpoints on my readers. These are very important concepts.

 

A theme is a philosophical argument. The resolution of the argument is the climax of the novel. In this case, every novel is a rhetorical development. That rhetorical development supports the philosophical argument of the theme. The actual resolution of the argument occurs in the climax. The conclusions are stated or unstated.

 

I guess this is the point to mention Greek arguments compared to Roman or other Western arguments. In a Greek philosophical argument, the conclusions are unstated. The Greek author (philosopher) would argue that the telos (conclusion, so to speak) of the argument is self-evident. If it is not self-evident, the philosopher (author) did not present the logos properly. This is why Greek Aesop’s fables have no morals, but the Romans added morals to the fables. A Greek philosophical text has no conclusion—a little problem that flummoxes readers of the New Testament to no end. The New Testament is composed of Greek documents—they never state their conclusions. Jesus Christ never states the conclusions of his arguments. This causes unbelievable mistakes in understanding Jesus, the New Testament documents, and Greek documents in general. There is even more.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—Inspiration: more about Rhetoric

23 September 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m on the tarmac at home station.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Here is the breakdown of my reader’s question(s):

 

  • Explain to your readership how you define, identify, develop and present rhetorical situations in your novels.

 

  1. Present a framework for rhetorical situations, as well as tricks, traps and techniques, with examples.
  2. Employ Aristotle’s (5) elements of rhetoric: Logos Ethos, Pathos, Telos and Kairos, to provide writer’s advice.
  3. Use this approach to provide elements of rhetoric, and good speech writing for use in a debate club.

 

This is the basic form of a logical argument in philosophical logic.

  1. Definitions
  2. Assumptions
  3. Argument
  4. Conclusions

 

From my standpoint, logic is the beginning of everything—philosophical logic. Also, from my standpoint, I don’t wish to interject my viewpoints on my readers. I wish to interject my characters viewpoints on my readers. These are very important concepts.

 

Every conversation in my novels is a rhetorical event—I design them precisely to achieve their specific purpose. The first purpose is to entertain. This means, the conversation looks, smells, feels, sounds, and appears to be a real conversation—although we know no conversation in a novel is “real.” The conversation must forward the plot and the character revelation. This is part of the overall entertainment in the novel. From a rhetorical standpoint, this means the logic in the conversation must support the telic flaw resolution directly or indirectly. How to achieve this is to focus the conversation on the protagonist’s telic flaw. This means the author must identify the protagonist’s telic flaw. Nothing logical can occur in any novel where the author doesn’t fully understand the telic flaw of the protagonist. I will go for generalities here, but the clearer the author understands the protagonist’s telic flaw, the better the conversation will be and the tighter it will fit in the context of the novel. A novel itself is a philosophical treatise. It is a logical argument based on the protagonist and the telic flaw. The resolution of the telic flaw is the conclusion of the philosophical argument. Let’s look at this further.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

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