Writing—Tension and Release, Second Setting of the Example

19 October 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Now, with these basics: a protagonist, a telic flaw, an antagonist, and optionally, a protagonist’s helper, you can develop a plot. Very simply, the plot is the resolution of the telic flaw of the protagonist. The novel is also the revelation of the protagonist that leads to the telic flaw resolution.

 

Tension and Release, we have the input of the scene from the previous scene or as the initial scene. Setting, input, output, tension and release, these four elements allow us to write an entertaining and focused scene that takes into consideration the plot and climax of the novel.

 

Tension and release is the mini-rising action and mini-climax in a scene. A scene may have one or more mini-climaxes. I turn setting elements into creative elements in the scene to build tension and then eventually release. To actually understand tension and release, you must start with the setting elements.

 

Setting elements are anything that begins the scene on the stage of the novel. I started with three characters and here they are:

 

Protagonist: a detective in a crime mystery. She is young, smart, tricky, and has a child-like face. Let’s also add that she smokes John Player Specials like a chimney and drinks Guinness at every meal including breakfast. Otherwise, she puts on an act like a dandified Lady.

 

The Scotland Yard detective who is actually the official on the case is a stuck up Oxford type who does use unorthodox policing methods but would never be caught doing them.

 

His assistant is a tough middle aged woman who speaks with a relatively high middle class London accent and is a stickler for police and gentlemanly decorum.

 

Setting: the three are at the scene of a gruesome murder. The sky is overcast, but not raining. It is spring and somewhat warm. The time is late afternoon. The detective is late for tea. They just finished examining the corpse and are discussing the details. The place is a vacant lot near a busy London street. The place is surrounded by typical police tape and all that kind of thing. They are waiting for the ambulance to come and take the body to the morgue.

 

I used the characteristics of the protagonist compared to the other characters to show how I would develop tension in the scenes; however, the character of the characters and especially the protagonist is just one example of something that can be used to develop tension in the scenes. The setting, setting elements (items), and plot devices (plot elements) can be used to develop tension. Let’s begin with some.

 

First, the sky is overcast, but not raining.

 

Second, it is spring and somewhat warm. This setting element also drives clothing choices. Did I forget to mention that clothing choices is one of the major things you should describe about your characters? The fact that it is spring also moderates the rain—to a degree. You can still have a torrential downpour, but the latitude for the writer increases naturally.

 

The temperature is warm, and here is the real tension developer. If you remember, they are all dressed in overcoats. Each of them have a great reason to get in doors where they can take off their rain and overcoats. This tension pushes to them to get their work done quickly. The author has a large latitude here too. The tension development about temperature can be very pressing to less pressing.

 

The emotional pressure can also be pushed to a breaking point. When people get too warm, they get grumpy. They become short with each other. These characters have little reason to be too civil with each other, but in this case, they can be pressed to an extreme. Remember, the assistant doesn’t like the fact that the lady detective smokes. If she lights up, there is a strong potential for an slight altercation. The temperature makes the situation and the potential tension even greater—it just depends on the intention of the author.

 

The next step will be settings, items, and finally plot devices.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

 

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Writing—Tension and Release, Setting of the Example

18 October 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Now, with these basics: a protagonist, a telic flaw, an antagonist, and optionally, a protagonist’s helper, you can develop a plot. Very simply, the plot is the resolution of the telic flaw of the protagonist. The novel is also the revelation of the protagonist that leads to the telic flaw resolution.

 

Tension and Release, we have the input of the scene from the previous scene or as the initial scene. Setting, input, output, tension and release, these four elements allow us to write an entertaining and focused scene that takes into consideration the plot and climax of the novel.

 

Tension and release is the mini-rising action and mini-climax in a scene. A scene may have one or more mini-climaxes. I turn setting elements into creative elements in the scene to build tension and then eventually release. To actually understand tension and release, you must start with the setting elements.

 

Setting elements are anything that begins the scene on the stage of the novel. I started with three characters and here they are:

 

Protagonist: a detective in a crime mystery. She is young, smart, tricky, and has a child-like face. Let’s also add that she smokes John Player Specials like a chimney and drinks Guinness at every meal including breakfast. Otherwise, she puts on an act like a dandified Lady.

 

The Scotland Yard detective who is actually the official on the case is a stuck up Oxford type who does use unorthodox policing methods but would never be caught doing them.

 

His assistant is a tough middle aged woman who speaks with a relatively high middle class London accent and is a stickler for police and gentlemanly decorum.

 

Setting: the three are at the scene of a gruesome murder. The sky is overcast, but not raining. It is spring and somewhat warm. The time is late afternoon. The detective is late for tea. They just finished examining the corpse and are discussing the details. The place is a vacant lot near a busy London street. The place is surrounded by typical police tape and all that kind of thing. They are waiting for the ambulance to come and take the body to the morgue.

 

I used the characteristics of the protagonist compared to the other characters to show how I would develop tension in the scenes; however, the character of the characters and especially the protagonist is just one example of something that can be used to develop tension in the scenes. The setting, setting elements (items), and plot devices (plot elements) can be used to develop tension. Let’s begin with some.

 

First, the sky is overcast, but not raining. This drives or should drive clothing choices and other elements in the scene. Our detective girl would likely have a very chic white raincoat and an umbrella. The assistant would carry an old black umbrella and wear an old tan coat. The police detective wore his shabby black overcoat, but forgot his brolly. His assistant brought it along.

 

The tension development can be handled many ways. One of the most tension developing would be to have the rain either intermittent or immanent. The buildup is the question of whether it will rain or not and finally when it does, what will happen, and when it will stop. A very astute author could make the rain drive the tension very tautly by ratcheting up the tension with each increase or decrease in the rain. Thus, at the beginning it is a light sprinkle which the lady detective puts up her white umbrella right away. The police detective continues to examine something. As the rain increases, the assistant puts up her umbrella and puts up her collar (in spite of the heat). She hands the brolly to the inspector, but he ignores her.

 

The lady detective observes everything and while the police inspector’s face is being covered with rain, she is finding some clues. There is so much more that you can do with this. The rain might chase them all to the nearest teahouse or pub. One of them might slip. They might be splashed by a car while at the curb. Just think of all the tension you can develop just with an overcast and potentially rainy sky.

 

The next step will be settings, items, and finally plot devices.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—Tension and Release, Character Conclusion of the Example

17 October 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Now, with these basics: a protagonist, a telic flaw, an antagonist, and optionally, a protagonist’s helper, you can develop a plot. Very simply, the plot is the resolution of the telic flaw of the protagonist. The novel is also the revelation of the protagonist that leads to the telic flaw resolution.

 

Tension and Release, we have the input of the scene from the previous scene or as the initial scene. Setting, input, output, tension and release, these four elements allow us to write an entertaining and focused scene that takes into consideration the plot and climax of the novel.

 

Tension and release is the mini-rising action and mini-climax in a scene. A scene may have one or more mini-climaxes. I turn setting elements into creative elements in the scene to build tension and then eventually release. To actually understand tension and release, you must start with the setting elements.

 

Setting elements are anything that begins the scene on the stage of the novel. I started with three characters and here they are:

 

Protagonist: a detective in a crime mystery. She is young, smart, tricky, and has a child-like face. Let’s also add that she smokes John Player Specials like a chimney and drinks Guinness at every meal including breakfast. Otherwise, she puts on an act like a dandified Lady.

 

The Scotland Yard detective who is actually the official on the case is a stuck up Oxford type who does use unorthodox policing methods but would never be caught doing them.

 

His assistant is a tough middle aged woman who speaks with a relatively high middle class London accent and is a stickler for police and gentlemanly decorum.

 

Setting: the three are at the scene of a gruesome murder. The sky is overcast, but not raining. It is spring and somewhat warm. The time is late afternoon. The detective is late for tea. They just finished examining the corpse and are discussing the details. The place is a vacant lot near a busy London street. The place is surrounded by typical police tape and all that kind of thing. They are waiting for the ambulance to come and take the body to the morgue.

 

Let’s continue with tension and release development. First, the girl-like detective lights a John Player, and the assistant always complains when she does.

 

Second, the girl detective is impatient with the investigation speed, and the police detective is impatient with the girl and any rushing to conclusions.

 

Third, the girl provides telling logical reasoning that eclipses the police detective’s skills.

 

Forth, the girl’s looks are young and striking.

 

Fifth, the girl can affect the manners of the highly born as well as those of the street.

 

Sixth, she has a will of her own.

 

There is always more to write, but I’ll conclude this example about characters and tension. The purpose of this example was to show you directly how to use the characteristics of characters to drive tension in scenes. I focused on the protagonist and her interaction with the other major characters. I brought up points about her personality and character that I would use through the entire novel to build tension in the scenes. Although other characters can and should be used to build tension, the protagonist is the chief and best character for this. This should be obvious from the role and purpose of the protagonist. More than this, if the protagonist isn’t the character who is building and developing tension, then you chose the wrong person to write about.

 

I am so enamored about this character, I might even write a novel about her. The way I pictured her for you is unique among most detective novels I’ve read. I think I could do some wonderful things with her. In fact, I think I could set her up in a wonderful fashion to bring out her full pathos.

 

If you haven’t noticed, this protagonist produces tension just by being alive, especially in the environment I envision. Conflict is the word of the day for tension, and by conflict, I don’t mean toe to toe fighting, although it can be that, I simply mean the kind of verbal and potentially physical sparing that regular people do in entertaining ways. It happens in real life—it happens even better in novels.

 

The next step will be settings and finally, items.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—Tension and Release, Sixth Part of the Example

16 October 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Now, with these basics: a protagonist, a telic flaw, an antagonist, and optionally, a protagonist’s helper, you can develop a plot. Very simply, the plot is the resolution of the telic flaw of the protagonist. The novel is also the revelation of the protagonist that leads to the telic flaw resolution.

 

Tension and Release, we have the input of the scene from the previous scene or as the initial scene. Setting, input, output, tension and release, these four elements allow us to write an entertaining and focused scene that takes into consideration the plot and climax of the novel.

 

Tension and release is the mini-rising action and mini-climax in a scene. A scene may have one or more mini-climaxes. I turn setting elements into creative elements in the scene to build tension and then eventually release. To actually understand tension and release, you must start with the setting elements.

 

Setting elements are anything that begins the scene on the stage of the novel. I started with three characters and here they are:

 

Protagonist: a detective in a crime mystery. She is young, smart, tricky, and has a child-like face. Let’s also add that she smokes John Player Specials like a chimney and drinks Guinness at every meal including breakfast. Otherwise, she puts on an act like a dandified Lady.

 

The Scotland Yard detective who is actually the official on the case is a stuck up Oxford type who does use unorthodox policing methods but would never be caught doing them.

 

His assistant is a tough middle aged woman who speaks with a relatively high middle class London accent and is a stickler for police and gentlemanly decorum.

 

Setting: the three are at the scene of a gruesome murder. The sky is overcast, but not raining. It is spring and somewhat warm. The time is late afternoon. The detective is late for tea. They just finished examining the corpse and are discussing the details. The place is a vacant lot near a busy London street. The place is surrounded by typical police tape and all that kind of thing. They are waiting for the ambulance to come and take the body to the morgue.

 

Let’s continue with tension and release development. First, the girl-like detective lights a John Player, and the assistant always complains when she does.

 

Second, the girl detective is impatient with the investigation speed, and the police detective is impatient with the girl and any rushing to conclusions.

 

Third, the girl provides telling logical reasoning that eclipses the police detective’s skills.

 

Forth, the girl’s looks are young and striking.

 

Fifth, the girl can affect the manners of the highly born as well as those of the street.

 

Sixth, she has a will of her own. Now, how this should play out is both delicate and should be entertaining. She doesn’t follow the dictates of the police detective—she follows the dictates of her own judgement.

 

I’ll get more into this, but I want to note, that this entire setup seems like a great novel idea. I don’t know what the plot should be, but I’ve outlined some fun characters.

 

The tension and release provided by “a will of her own,” means that when the police detective tells her to not attend a certain high end event, of course, she does. When the police detective warns her off–she doesn’t. When the police detective tells her not to look—she must. She isn’t contrary—she is not held back by stereotypes or old fashioned ideas. She doesn’t conform to them—she uses them. This is the power in such a character. Characters in modern novels always conform to some cultural stereotype—they can’t help in. In some cases these stereotypes are egregious, but normal. People just accept them because of what and who they are. Thus, the main girl character in Harry Potty, H. is eternally constrained to act like a…girl. She is bound in a cultural stereotype, and she can’t even be the protagonist. To bad, so sad, H. On the other hand, I really like to have male and female protagonists, and I love for my characters to not meet any stereotype at all. I accede to them, but my characters don’t depend on them. They exceed the expectations of the norm.

 

I think this is an important concept. In any case, when a character does not fit a stereotype, by design that character becomes to a degree automatically romantic and entertaining. Much depends on handling of such a character.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—Tension and Release, Fifth Part of the Example

15 October 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Now, with these basics: a protagonist, a telic flaw, an antagonist, and optionally, a protagonist’s helper, you can develop a plot. Very simply, the plot is the resolution of the telic flaw of the protagonist. The novel is also the revelation of the protagonist that leads to the telic flaw resolution.

 

Tension and Release, we have the input of the scene from the previous scene or as the initial scene. Setting, input, output, tension and release, these four elements allow us to write an entertaining and focused scene that takes into consideration the plot and climax of the novel.

 

Tension and release is the mini-rising action and mini-climax in a scene. A scene may have one or more mini-climaxes. I turn setting elements into creative elements in the scene to build tension and then eventually release. To actually understand tension and release, you must start with the setting elements.

 

Setting elements are anything that begins the scene on the stage of the novel. I started with three characters and here they are:

 

Protagonist: a detective in a crime mystery. She is young, smart, tricky, and has a child-like face. Let’s also add that she smokes John Player Specials like a chimney and drinks Guinness at every meal including breakfast. Otherwise, she puts on an act like a dandified Lady.

 

The Scotland Yard detective who is actually the official on the case is a stuck up Oxford type who does use unorthodox policing methods but would never be caught doing them.

 

His assistant is a tough middle aged woman who speaks with a relatively high middle class London accent and is a stickler for police and gentlemanly decorum.

 

Setting: the three are at the scene of a gruesome murder. The sky is overcast, but not raining. It is spring and somewhat warm. The time is late afternoon. The detective is late for tea. They just finished examining the corpse and are discussing the details. The place is a vacant lot near a busy London street. The place is surrounded by typical police tape and all that kind of thing. They are waiting for the ambulance to come and take the body to the morgue.

 

Let’s continue with tension and release development. First, the girl-like detective lights a John Player, and the assistant always complains when she does.

 

Second, the girl detective is impatient with the investigation speed, and the police detective is impatient with the girl and any rushing to conclusions.

 

Third, the girl provides telling logical reasoning that eclipses the police detective’s skills.

 

Forth, the girl’s looks are young and striking.

 

Fifth, the girl can affect the manners of the highly born as well as those of the street. She isn’t a low-born person, she is a consummate actress. She acts the way she does to gain the most advantage from those she works with and interviews. In British society, this is more difficult than it might seem. People in Britain are categorized by their speech—note My Fair Lady and its predecessor if you will. This little observation is true today, the biggest problem is that many if not most Brits are unaware of their accents, much like people in the USA. A person who can accurately use the correct accent at the correct time can identify themselves as whatever class and from whatever area they wish.

 

Thus, we have our protagonist. She is very cagy and tricky. She understands how to act at any level of society and how to not.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—Tension and Release, More of the Example

14 October 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Now, with these basics: a protagonist, a telic flaw, an antagonist, and optionally, a protagonist’s helper, you can develop a plot. Very simply, the plot is the resolution of the telic flaw of the protagonist. The novel is also the revelation of the protagonist that leads to the telic flaw resolution.

 

Tension and Release, we have the input of the scene from the previous scene or as the initial scene. Setting, input, output, tension and release, these four elements allow us to write an entertaining and focused scene that takes into consideration the plot and climax of the novel.

 

Tension and release is the mini-rising action and mini-climax in a scene. A scene may have one or more mini-climaxes. I turn setting elements into creative elements in the scene to build tension and then eventually release. To actually understand tension and release, you must start with the setting elements.

 

Setting elements are anything that begins the scene on the stage of the novel. I started with three characters and here they are:

 

Protagonist: a detective in a crime mystery. She is young, smart, tricky, and has a child-like face. Let’s also add that she smokes John Player Specials like a chimney and drinks Guinness at every meal including breakfast. Otherwise, she puts on an act like a dandified Lady.

 

The Scotland Yard detective who is actually the official on the case is a stuck up Oxford type who does use unorthodox policing methods but would never be caught doing them.

 

His assistant is a tough middle aged woman who speaks with a relatively high middle class London accent and is a stickler for police and gentlemanly decorum.

 

Setting: the three are at the scene of a gruesome murder. The sky is overcast, but not raining. It is spring and somewhat warm. The time is late afternoon. The detective is late for tea. They just finished examining the corpse and are discussing the details. The place is a vacant lot near a busy London street. The place is surrounded by typical police tape and all that kind of thing. They are waiting for the ambulance to come and take the body to the morgue.

 

Let’s continue with tension and release development. First, the girl-like detective lights a John Player, and the assistant always complains when she does.

 

Second, the girl detective is impatient with the investigation speed, and the police detective is impatient with the girl and any rushing to conclusions.

 

Third, the girl provides telling logical reasoning that eclipses the police detective’s skills.

 

Forth, the girl’s looks are young and striking. This is an obvious pathos play, but this also provides tension through the entire novel. Imagine, the girl detective is mistaken for the police detective’s daughter, granddaughter, niece, etc. She can be likewise mistaken for the assistant’s daughter, granddaughter, niece, etc. The comedy and other effects are almost unlimited. I could use this joke in almost every scene, but it is more than just a joke.

 

The youthful looks and beauty of the protagonist can be a tool to the protagonist or a foil to the protagonist. I suggest a tool, but the classical stereotype has been as a foil. I very much like to write about characters who are still in the bloom of youth, but use their beauty and youth to win the hearts and minds of others.

 

A youthful character can play many parts and have many effects on those whom they target. In our youthful detective protagonist, this might provide the solution to the crime or to many crimes. She can play the debutant, the friend, the child, the maid, the lady’s maid, and many other roles. In fact, this is such an intriguing idea, I might eventually write something about it. I don’t think I’ve read or seen anything quite like this. Usually, the woman is worldly wise and hard bitten, or she is high class and doesn’t get her hands dirty. The idea of an innocent-looking but very aware and sneaky girl detective seems very appealing.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—Tension and Release, More of the Example

13 October 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Now, with these basics: a protagonist, a telic flaw, an antagonist, and optionally, a protagonist’s helper, you can develop a plot. Very simply, the plot is the resolution of the telic flaw of the protagonist. The novel is also the revelation of the protagonist that leads to the telic flaw resolution.

 

Tension and Release, we have the input of the scene from the previous scene or as the initial scene. Setting, input, output, tension and release, these four elements allow us to write an entertaining and focused scene that takes into consideration the plot and climax of the novel.

 

Tension and release is the mini-rising action and mini-climax in a scene. A scene may have one or more mini-climaxes. I turn setting elements into creative elements in the scene to build tension and then eventually release. To actually understand tension and release, you must start with the setting elements.

 

Setting elements are anything that begins the scene on the stage of the novel. I started with three characters and here they are:

 

Protagonist: a detective in a crime mystery. She is young, smart, tricky, and has a child-like face. Let’s also add that she smokes John Player Specials like a chimney and drinks Guinness at every meal including breakfast. Otherwise, she puts on an act like a dandified Lady.

 

The Scotland Yard detective who is actually the official on the case is a stuck up Oxford type who does use unorthodox policing methods but would never be caught doing them.

 

His assistant is a tough middle aged woman who speaks with a relatively high middle class London accent and is a stickler for police and gentlemanly decorum.

 

Setting: the three are at the scene of a gruesome murder. The sky is overcast, but not raining. It is spring and somewhat warm. The time is late afternoon. The detective is late for tea. They just finished examining the corpse and are discussing the details. The place is a vacant lot near a busy London street. The place is surrounded by typical police tape and all that kind of thing. They are waiting for the ambulance to come and take the body to the morgue.

 

Let’s continue with tension and release development. First, the girl-like detective lights a John Player, and the assistant always complains when she does.

 

Second, the girl detective is impatient with the investigation speed, and the police detective is impatient with the girl and any rushing to conclusions.

 

Third, the girl provides telling logical reasoning that eclipses the police detective’s skills. This is the telling part of this setup. In all of these types of novels, the detective protagonist is the logical and reasoning personality.

 

You can switch this up, but this would provide an entirely different kind of novel. For example, if the girl detective were clumsy and illogical, but in some way had bursts of reasoning. You see the problems here, right? The protagonist must be the protagonist. I advise romantic characters. A romantic character can have issues, but their basic capabilities must set them apart in some way from normal humankind. It does no good to have an incompetent protagonist. In that case, the police detective would become the actual protagonist, and where is the fun in that?

 

The entertainment of Sherlock Holms is that he can figure out the solution to the crime above and beyond the police detective. Sherlock is am idiosyncratic genius. If he weren’t, his stories wouldn’t be entertaining at all. Likewise, our protagonist, the girl detective must be the intellectual and capable one. You can put in some degree of clumsiness and lack of social skills, but she must be able to figure out the mystery before anyone else. If she didn’t, she wouldn’t be worth writing about.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment