Writing—Characters

22 June 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back on the tarmac in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Let’s look as characters and character development. I think all fiction writing hinges on this. If a novel is the revelation of the protagonist, then most certainly, the character is the primary focus of any fiction writing. The trick is that you can never fully separate the character from the plot or theme. I would say, the plot and the theme are baggage of the protagonist. I think this should be obvious, but it isn’t self-evident. You can’t separate the plot and the theme from the protagonist because the telic flaw of the protagonist results in the resolution of the plot and the theme. Thus the plot and the theme are fully functioning elements of the profile and essence of the protagonist.

 

My novels and most novels begin with the protagonist. Even novels that don’t begin explicitly with the protagonist are setting up the entire novel for the revelation of the protagonist. I don’t mean prologues either. I think this idea of the protagonist and the telic flaw should be the focus of all character and especially protagonist character development. We’ll look into this.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—Back to the Beginning

21 June 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back on the tarmac in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

1.Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2.Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3.Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4.Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5.Write the release

6.Write the kicker

 

If you follow the scene outline and the scene method, you can write a scene. There are some basic parts of a scene that I kind of blew through. These basic parts are necessary to any writing. They are specific to any scene, novel, short story, or other fiction writing. To be specific, they are the characters and the setting. You can add to that plot and scene, but both the plot and scene are somewhat dependent on the characters and the setting. I’d go so far as to note that they are never independent of each other. In fact, I would declare that the characters and setting are more independent of the plot and theme than the other way around. If you conclude as I do that the plot is the revelation of the protagonist, then the protagonist always comes before the plot. This is what I would like to take a look at and see how it fits into the concept of scenes and the novel. We’ll look at characters and setting.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—Scenes: more Kicker

20 June 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back on the tarmac in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

1.Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2.Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3.Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4.Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5.Write the release

6.Write the kicker

 

The input of the scene is Bill and Sharon walk home. We really didn’t determine the setting—it is so dependent on the characters and the overall setting of the novel. In any case, let’s make the setting: Sharon led Bill along the tree shaded dirt lane. The sun peaked wanly through the leaves and threatened at any moment to disappear from the sky. Here are the additional setting elements: a frilly peach dress for Sharon and a dark green suit coat for Bill. Bill is carrying their books in book bags. Additionally, we can add the creative element of a rain storm during the day. The country lane is marked with puddles. Add to that Sharon is wearing hard shoes instead of her usual soft slippers. She keeps sinking a little in the softened dirt of the lane.

 

I hope you are familiar with the kicker, and you know how to write one. This is one of those kinds of subjects that is very difficult to instruct to those who have no idea what you are writing about. At the end of a scene or especially a chapter, if you noticed a cliffhanger, a funny or pithy ending statement, or an ironic twist—that is a kicker.

 

Most kickers are a funny or pithy ending statement. If the situation is tense, the author might use a cliffhanger or an ironic twist. The entire point of the kicker is to prepare the reader for the next chapter or scene by leaving them with something that encourages them to read on.   You want your readers to read and not stop reading. You want them to be so completely immersed in your writing that they don’t want to leave it. The kicker holds them though the break between scenes and chapters.

 

Build the kicker with the same care you build the setting. Build it to hold your readers and don’t let them go.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—Scenes: Kicker

19 June 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back on the tarmac in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

1.Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2.Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3.Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4.Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5.Write the release

6.Write the kicker

 

The input of the scene is Bill and Sharon walk home. We really didn’t determine the setting—it is so dependent on the characters and the overall setting of the novel. In any case, let’s make the setting: Sharon led Bill along the tree shaded dirt lane. The sun peaked wanly through the leaves and threatened at any moment to disappear from the sky. Here are the additional setting elements: a frilly peach dress for Sharon and a dark green suit coat for Bill. Bill is carrying their books in book bags. Additionally, we can add the creative element of a rain storm during the day. The country lane is marked with puddles. Add to that Sharon is wearing hard shoes instead of her usual soft slippers. She keeps sinking a little in the softened dirt of the lane.

 

The final step is the kicker. The kicker is entirely dependent on the release and the end point of the scene. For example, if the scene ends up with Bill and Sharon going home partially dressed in mud, you might have Sharon’s mother say, “Well, coming home with soiled clothing, but clean hearts.” On the other hand, if Sharon and Bill stop at the old mill pond and bathe and wash their clothes, you could put some other pithy saying in the mouth of someone’s mother, father, or that character. If they have a tryst, you might have some other kicker entirely. If they stayed out all night letting their clothing dry, you might have them fall into the mud again on the way home—there is an ironic kicker. In any case, you need to take the end circumstances of the scene and the situation in stride and provide an appropriate ending to the scene. I implore you, don’t just end the scene, give your readers a kicker. A kicker is like a cliffhanger of sorts. In fact, a kicker can be a cliffhanger. The point is to give your readers a reason to keep reading. Hopefully you scenes will be filled with entertainment and excitement—a kicker just tops the cake, so to speak.

 

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—Scenes: more Release

18 June 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back on the tarmac in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

1.Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2.Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3.Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4.Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5.Write the release

6.Write the kicker

 

The input of the scene is Bill and Sharon walk home. We really didn’t determine the setting—it is so dependent on the characters and the overall setting of the novel. In any case, let’s make the setting: Sharon led Bill along the tree shaded dirt lane. The sun peaked wanly through the leaves and threatened at any moment to disappear from the sky. Here are the additional setting elements: a frilly peach dress for Sharon and a dark green suit coat for Bill. Bill is carrying their books in book bags. Additionally, we can add the creative element of a rain storm during the day. The country lane is marked with puddles. Add to that Sharon is wearing hard shoes instead of her usual soft slippers. She keeps sinking a little in the softened dirt of the lane.

 

If the release of this scene is that Sharon falls into the mud and drags Bill with her, then what happens next? This is either the next scene or a continuation of the current scene. It all depends where you want to go as an author. The setup is right there. Depending on the type of story, plot, and theme, Sharon and Bill could go to the mill pond, strip naked, and wash themselves and their clothing. Or, they could head home in their current condition. The first provides many setups for tension and release. The second does too. The first might end up in a lovers tryst. It might end up with more embarrassing hijinks. It might end up with closeness of a great secret—a secret that can be exploited later. There are more and more situations. I can imagine a hundred outcomes and a hundred setups. The point is this, use the tension and release to jump to the next tension and release. Build the next scene with fragments of the current scene. Project all this through the plot, storyline, and theme of the novel. The power of entertainment is what you can imagine and literally, how you resolve the tension and release—not just in one scene, but in all the scenes.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—Scenes: Release

17 June 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back on the tarmac in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

1.Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2.Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3.Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4.Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5.Write the release

6.Write the kicker

 

The input of the scene is Bill and Sharon walk home. We really didn’t determine the setting—it is so dependent on the characters and the overall setting of the novel. In any case, let’s make the setting: Sharon led Bill along the tree shaded dirt lane. The sun peaked wanly through the leaves and threatened at any moment to disappear from the sky. Here are the additional setting elements: a frilly peach dress for Sharon and a dark green suit coat for Bill. Bill is carrying their books in book bags. Additionally, we can add the creative element of a rain storm during the day. The country lane is marked with puddles. Add to that Sharon is wearing hard shoes instead of her usual soft slippers. She keeps sinking a little in the softened dirt of the lane.

 

I have my creative elements and my tension. What am I going to do with it? The expectation in this scene is that Sharon will trip in the mud. This is a release. How the author manages this release is a big deal. I could have her just trip and regain her balance, but what’s the point?   That is a wasted tension and a wasted release. I could have her fall flat on her face in the mud. I can do something with that. That is a great release, but what about Bill—he’s just a setting element until I try to resolve the mud and clothing issues. More to the point, I like a release where Sharon falls into the mud and Bill tries to save her, but ends up in the mud himself and on top of her. This is exactly the kind of release the tension built up. This is the use of all the Chekov’s guns in the setting and creative elements. There is more. What do we do with this situation now that we have built it?

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—Scenes: Tension

16 June 2017, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: back on the tarmac in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

1.Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2.Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3.Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4.Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5.Write the release

6.Write the kicker

 

The input of the scene is Bill and Sharon walk home. We really didn’t determine the setting—it is so dependent on the characters and the overall setting of the novel. In any case, let’s make the setting: Sharon led Bill along the tree shaded dirt lane. The sun peaked wanly through the leaves and threatened at any moment to disappear from the sky. Here are the additional setting elements: a frilly peach dress for Sharon and a dark green suit coat for Bill. Bill is carrying their books in book bags. Additionally, we can add the creative element of a rain storm during the day. The country lane is marked with puddles. Add to that Sharon is wearing hard shoes instead of her usual soft slippers. She keeps sinking a little in the softened dirt of the lane.

 

Yesterday, I just jumped forward into the tension and release and let you in on he whole. Now, I’ll back up a little and play to the tension side of the equation. I left the description and setting above. The creative elements are the setting elements. These are the nouns in the setting description. The tension development is accomplished just by the existence of these elements. We have Sharon and Bill walking home along the muddy dirt lane. They are wearing their fine clothing. Sharon has on hard heeled shoes that sink into the mud of the lane. The tension is already there—these are Chekov’s guns. The reader knows something must happen in regard to the dirt lane, the mud and puddles, the hard shoes, the fine clothing, and the relationship of Sharon and Bill. If nothing happens, the author has wasted a wonderful setting and a bunch of creative elements. If the author wasn’t going to do something with the scene, she or he should just write: Sharon and Bill walked home. Since this isn’t the case, the author must do something with these creative elements. By the way, if the author isn’t going to do anything with them, just cut the scene. There is no reason for it.

 

This tension development is obviously pointing to a certain release—the author still has lots of choices, but we’ll discuss those in release.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment