Writing—It’s FUNdamental, Building Skills, Scene Development, Starting

26 August 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m back home on the tarmac.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Writing is a chore. How do we make writing as enjoyable as possible? Then how do we bring to bear those skills. Let’s look at building writing skills.

 

For a scene output we need characters, a setting, and an implied action. We need the same for a scene input. I picked the initial scene from one of my published novels, A Season of Honor. At the end of the first scene which you can read at https://www.amazon.com/Season-Honor-L-D-Alford/dp/1602901082?ie=UTF8&adid=0H131228GTT170EXAWZX&camp=14573&creative=327641&creativeASIN=1602901082&linkCode=as1&ref-refURL=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.alfordhome.com%2FASeasonofHonor.com%2Findex.htm&ref_=as_sl_pc_tf_lc&tag=wwwldalfordco-20, Baron Shawn du Locke and Count Ian Acier have made an agreement. Shawn will convey Ian’s daughter to the Capital planet to marry a Duke’s son. The implied output is that we will meet the other travelers. In this case, specifically Elina Acier. The setting of the next scene is also implied—it should be on Acier. Then we have our characters: Count Acier, Baron du Locke, Elina. We have a setting: soon after the initial meeting and on Acier. We have an implied action: an introduction.

 

I know some of this is a repeat form yesterday, but we need these pieces to write and next scene. We need the output of the previous scene for the input of the next scene. Here is what I did to write the next scene. My setting was the formal ballroom of the House Acier. There, Shawn meets, Ian’s wife, the Lady Acier, his daughter, Elina, and his ward, Kran Noir. These are the characters. The problem and the primary tension builder in the scene is that Elina could be a twin to Shawn’s lost love, Lyral Neuterra. In The End of Honor, Lyral was executed and Shawn fought an intragalactic war in her name. The primary tension and release comes from this creative element. This is also one of the primary creative elements of the novel and the one that leads to the climax. There are other creative elements in the scene. Lady Acier is unhappy with Shawn’s actions. He was a Prince, he is now a Baron. This also builds tension in the scene. Ian is confused by Shawn’s reaction to Elina. This is a creative element through the entire novel—that is Shawn’s reaction to Elina. This is beyond the simple accident that Elina looks like Lyral (they were cousins, but the way). There are more creative elements in the scene. The Matron Pembray was also the matron to Lyral Neuterra. Further, Kran is the brother of the man Elina is affianced to. These creative elements all whirl about the scene to produce tension and release—this is the means of building entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—It’s FUNdamental, Building Skills, Scene Development, Input

25 August 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m back home on the tarmac.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Writing is a chore. How do we make writing as enjoyable as possible? Then how do we bring to bear those skills. Let’s look at building writing skills.

 

The first step is writing a scene. I showed you how to write a good paragraph. This is the kind of skill you should have learned in middle school. If you can write a good paragraph, you are ready to write a scene. We will focus on the scene at the moment, not necessarily an entertaining scene. Look at the scene development outline above. Unless this is the initial scene in the novel, you will have a scene input. For this exercise let’s assume we have a scene input. The output of the previous scene will always (or most of the time) provide the input for the next scene. It is difficult to just jump into writing a scene without an input, so let’s make one up. For a scene output we need characters, a setting, and an implied action. We need the same for a scene input. Let’s pick something from one of my published novels. You can read the first chapters at Amazon and some other booksellers. Let’s look at A Season of Honor. At the end of the first scene which you can read at https://www.amazon.com/Season-Honor-L-D-Alford/dp/1602901082?ie=UTF8&adid=0H131228GTT170EXAWZX&camp=14573&creative=327641&creativeASIN=1602901082&linkCode=as1&ref-refURL=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.alfordhome.com%2FASeasonofHonor.com%2Findex.htm&ref_=as_sl_pc_tf_lc&tag=wwwldalfordco-20, Baron Shawn du Locke and Count Ian Acier have made an agreement. Shawn will convey Ian’s daughter to the Capital planet to marry a Duke’s son. The implied output is that we will meet the other travelers. In this case, specifically Elina Acier. The setting of the next scene is also implied—it should be on Acier. Then we have our characters: Count Acier, Baron du Locke, Elina. We have a setting: soon after the initial meeting and on Acier. We have an implied action: an introduction.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—It’s FUNdamental, Building Skills, Scene Development

24 August 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m back home on the tarmac.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Writing is a chore. How do we make writing as enjoyable as possible? Then how do we bring to bear those skills. Let’s look at building writing skills.

 

I’ve been through the tools of developing scenes and given exercises for practicing these tools. I have tried very hard to provide you exercises that will result in writing you can use in the future. I would hate to give you an exercise that is not every useful to you. In any case, I have written many many words, paragraphs, and scenes that I never used in a story or a novel. The power is the practice, but eventually, you need to get out on the golf course, the mountain, or the football field and put your skills to use.

 

The author’s field of endeavor is the scene. I know, I know, no one (or very few) teaches writing in scenes at the university, or even at writer’s events. The trick to great writing is the scene. If you want to be an author of any skill at all, you need to learn to write a good scene. Actually, you need to write an entertaining scene and be able to accomplish that feat over and over until you complete a novel. Then you need to do it again, that is write another novel—until you reach about one million words. At that point, chances are, you have arrived. The trick is writing entertaining scenes.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—It’s FUNdamental, Building Skills, still more Practice Character Associations as Creative Elements in Scenes

23 August 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m back home on the tarmac.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Writing is a chore. How do we make writing as enjoyable as possible? Then how do we bring to bear those skills. Let’s look at building writing skills.

 

I think creative elements, especially characters as creative elements, are the most important things a writer in training can work on. If you are a writer in training (aren’t we all) or if you consider yourself established to a degree, I suggest using the practice I’m recommending. If you are in training, this will help you develop a potentially great character. If you are established it might get your juices flowing. If you don’t want to go to the details of naming, describing, and developing, at least outline them the way I am. Let’s try another example. Take an associative character type—let’s say a priest. We expect priests to be good and kind and helpful. I don’t want a nasty priest, but to break the association, lets’ make our priest appear like a steelworker. He is strong and massive. He barely fits in his robes. He is tall and has a broken nose. At the same time, he is tender and gentle, and is the priest for an all girl’s school. I made such a character for my Ancient Light novels. This certain father provides advise and help to multiple generations of my characters and is even referred to in one of my Enchantment novels—still kind and gentle. Build characters who can be excellent creative elements for your scenes—this is how you enjoy writing and build skills.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—It’s FUNdamental, Building Skills, more Practice Character Associations as Creative Elements in Scenes

22 August 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m back home on the tarmac.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Writing is a chore. How do we make writing as enjoyable as possible? Then how do we bring to bear those skills. Let’s look at building writing skills.

 

Let’s do some more writing. I liked the previous example so much, do it again. Take another character and develop an association. Then bend that association around to produce a new type of character. Here is my example for today, take a girl who is abused, hungry, and homeless but a math genius. She has scholarships and is going to a university. Make this character one who has learned well from her past and is mature, kind, and forward thinking. Is this character unusual, unique, different than you might expect? I actually wrote an entire novel about this girl, and I intend to write another. Her name is Lilly. My point to you, either in your own writing or as exercises to improve your writing, take an associative character: Lilly is abused, homeless, and hungry. Turn the character around—away from a stereotype, and use this character. If such a character doesn’t fit in your writing style, I do understand. My writing is filled with these types of characters. I usually don’t develop them in the way I described—that is, I usually don’t start with an association and twist that association. I usually develop my characters from the twist and back out their associations. The point is the associations—this is where the creative elements come from.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—It’s FUNdamental, Building Skills, Practice Character Associations as Creative Elements in Scenes

21 August 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m back home on the tarmac.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Writing is a chore. How do we make writing as enjoyable as possible? Then how do we bring to bear those skills. Let’s look at building writing skills.

 

Let’s do some writing. Take a character and develop an association. Then bend that association around to produce a new type of character—or perhaps I should write a unique character. This exercise requires you to develop a character, develop an association (part of the character), then express the creative element of that association in a way that changes the association. I’ll give you an example. Take a character Amy Swartz. She is a witch. That is the character association. Now twist it around. Amy acts like a witch, but she looks young, sweet, and very hip. Her hair is blond, and she wear it in long pigtails. You would trust her as your baby sitter unless you know her deeper and darker secret. She is ruthless and devilish. Her vocabulary is normally nice, but is sometimes so salty no child should be exposed to her.

 

There, an example of a character association that is changed in a character. This produces a whole array of creative elements we can use in the writing.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—It’s FUNdamental, Building Skills, more Other Character Associations as Creative Elements in Scenes

20 August 2016, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression: I’m back home on the tarmac.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form. It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing. Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going. Let me help you with that.

 

Writing is a chore. How do we make writing as enjoyable as possible? Then how do we bring to bear those skills. Let’s look at building writing skills.

 

Associations concerning characters can also be called stereotypes. The moment an author describes a character with a certain stereotype, that character is cast immediately by all the associations and attributes of the stereotype. The example I used yesterday is a spy. You can use all kinds of associations like this. For example, an academic, a doctor, a nurse, a military officer, a princess. The trick, from my standpoint, is to turn these stereotypes and associations into something entirely different in the mind of your readers. In my published novel, The End of Honor, I have a character who is supposed to be a princess, but is nothing like a princess (in her own mind). Likewise, the man she falls in love with, is a military officer, but unlike the military officers our erstwhile princess is used to. This breaking of stereotypes is one of my favorite methods of exciting my readers through unexpected associations. If you, as an author, realize the moment you mention a spy, or a minister, or an author, or a professor, or a teacher, you provide an automatic description to your readers. The trick is to take this stereotype image, turn it into something creatively different, then use it as a creative element to drive your plot and character revelation.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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