Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Return

16 October 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  How about as a hero?

Let me show you how to make Sorcha a zero.  We saw the initial scene, but there is always more.

September 1993, Saint Malo, France   

Lady Glamis wrinkled her nose, “Your slippers are still wet.  Don’t put them on until you are safely away.”

       Sorcha glanced around, “Ladies, don’t leave anything that might give suspicion.”

       Lady Glamis nodded.

       They all slipped out of the large room and retreated the way they had come.  They saw no one, and arrived at the cellar door without anyone the wiser.  Before they entered the cellar, Lady Glamis kissed their cheeks.  They all curtsied to her.  They walked down the stone steps into the place.  Deidre opened the trap door, and the four of them made their way down into the sub cellar.

       They put on their sodden slippers and walked cautiously to the ladder into the ecole.  Deidre climbed the ladder and opened the trap door.  They all followed her up and arrived unseen in the kitchen cellar.  They all removed their foot gear.  El swept the sand over the trapdoor and swept their footprints away.  They regained the hall before the kitchen and slipped back to Deidre’s room.  Only then could they feel completely safe again.

I haven’t shown you this part before.  This is part of the girls’ introduction to their new school.

I’m not certain how much more I will show you.  Perhaps a bit more, but for entertainment and education’s sake.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, more on Plans

15 October 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  How about as a hero?

Let me show you how to make Sorcha a zero.  We saw the initial scene, but there is always more.

September 1993, Saint Malo, France   

       Sorcha nodded, “Well said, sister.”  She encompassed them all in her glance, “Listen to me, all of you.  This situation isn’t exactly what it seems.  There are complexities for all of us.  The first is that Deidre, El, Laura, and I have commitments to the ecole and to this place.”

       Lady Glamis glared, “Political commitments?”

       “Family and educational commitments.”

       “Oh.”

       “Deidre and I are being finished, as are Laure and El.”

       “Finished.  What is finished?”

       Sorcha let out a sigh, “We are in training for our education politically and for our future lives.  Because of that, we are not at liberty to simply pick up and take you where you wish.  Our families and our honor would be at stake.  Secondly, I suspect any actions to help you escape would significantly prejudice Mother Roux against us.  It is imperative for our future that we remain students in good standing in her school and with the Mother Roux.”

       “Then I must do it all on my own.”

       “I am not suggesting that at all.  Is there any way you can enter the ecole or somehow connect with us directly or indirectly.”

       Lady Glamis snarled, “I have already secretly contacted you.  As citizens of Britany, you are my subjects and under my authority.”

       Sorcha continued, “Lady Glamis, the world has changed significantly during your captivity.  The best for you would be to learn about the modern world and learn how it works so you can make your way in it with us to help you.”

       “That all sounds very nice, but I’m the one cooped up in captivity here.”

       “Then let’s plan this all together.  We had not wanted anyone to know, but we four speak Breton.”

       El asked, “Why didn’t you want anyone to know?”

       Deidre threw out her hands, “It should be obvious.  We didn’t want any of the other girls to know we had any provincial roots.”

       Laura and El nodded, “Ah.”

       Sorcha rolled her eyes, “You see.  We are from Paris.  The others would hold us in contempt because of it.”

       El glanced down, “They do and they would.”

       Sorcha nodded, “We are not embarrassed by it, but we wanted to keep it under wraps.”

       Deidre whispered under her breath, “Not to mention, it is a breach of confidence.”

       Lady Glamis perked up, “What was that?”

       Sorcha glared at Deirdre, “Nothing.  Nothing at all.  The point is that at the moment, there are four here who could help you enter the ecole.”

       Lady Glamis cocked her head and squinted, “Enter the ecole.  I never thought of such a thing.”

       “You would have to be willing to put up with a very different situation.  You would need to be willing to learn some French.”

       “Never,” but the exclamation from Lady Glamis didn’t sound so certain.

       “Listen to me, Lady Glamis.  They have held you here in ignorance of the world around you.  To take your place, you must understand it to some degree.”

       Lady Glamis glanced at Sorcha, “And to do that I must learn the abominable tongue and acquiesce to their desires?”

       “To achieve your desires, yes, I would give you that advice.”

       “Then how am I to achieve this entry into the ecole?”

       “I suggest you ask an audience of Mother Roux.  She controls all here.  You should ask her if you can enter the ecole and interact with the students.  You should tell her that you wish to understand the world and fit yourself for it.”

       “What if she says no?”

       “Then continue to ask in a pleasant and Ladylike way.  Tell her you wish to equip yourself for today’s world.”

       Lady Glamis glanced to the side and scowled, “I’m afraid she will tell me I am unfit to enter her ecole.”

       “That may be true, but what else can you do?”

       “If she denies my petition?”

       “We can make plans for the future then.  During the Christmas holidays, Sorcha and I expect to return to Tours or Paris.  El and Laura will go to their homes.  Surely we can determine some means of helping you escape by then.  This is the beginning of October.  December is only a few months away.  If you can enter the school, you can learn to make your own way.  If you must wait a few more months, we can facilitate your escape.  In either case, you will be able to eventually return to Skipness.”

       Lady Glamis lowered her head in thought, “I must think on your proposals.  Let me give it some thought.  Let me see if the Mother Roux will grace me with an audience.”

       Deirdre remarked, “Whatever you do, don’t mention our names.  If you do, we are all compromised, and we will not be able to help you.”

       “Yes, yes, I see how that is.  I do like you all as friends.  I like the way your minds think.  I like your speech, and your manners.  What other leverage do I have against Mother Roux?  How might I force her to accept my petition?”

       Sorcha sat primly, “Do not force or demand.  Mother Roux will listen to reason, I think.  She is straightforward and thoughtful.  At first, she might not accede to your wishes, but I think she understands your position and power.  They no longer lock you away at night.  You already have the ability to leave when you desire it.  They either don’t fear you much, or they think you are not very dangerous to them.”

       “Am I dangerous to them?”

       “I think you are highly dangerous.”

       “Really?  That is something to think on.”

       Sorcha took a sip of her wine, “Try our proposals.  Do not incriminate us.  Do not mention us at all.  See if you can get into the ecole.  Act as if you are not dangerous at all.”

       “Yes, I see how this goes.  I’m willing to try it.  I do know something portentous is about to happen to me.”

       “How do you know that?”

       “Just as I knew you would visit me at the Fort and here in the cloister.  No one believes my prophecies, but they always come true.  Mother Roux will receive a visitor, or so I have seen.”

       They heard a gong.  Lady Glamis rose, “Now it is time for Nones.  The nuns will be occupied, and you may leave the way you came.”

       They all stood.

       Lady Glamis wrinkled her nose, “Your slippers are still wet.  Don’t put them on until you are safely away.”

       Sorcha glanced around, “Ladies, don’t leave anything that might give suspicion.”

       Lady Glamis nodded.

I haven’t shown you this part before.  This is part of the girls’ introduction to their new school.

Okay, now we are really planning.  First Sorcha and Dierdre must continue to hide who they are, and what they are about.  El and Laura don’t know anything—they are along for the ride.  Sorcha and Deirdre must keep them uninformed and at the same time influence Lady Glamis to do what she should.

Obviously, they can’t allow Lady Glamis to run off on her own.  Part of this is the risk to having a nearly ignorant, illiterate, and one who can’t speak the language neither French nor English.  The problem of this should be obvious—then there is Sorcha and Deirdre’s assignment.

The have no idea what their assignment might be, but we know as they do, it most likely has some relation to Lady Glamis.  Why else would Sorcha and Deidre’s mother send them to some out of the way Breton finishing school?  We shall see exactly what is going on soon.

Actually, I keep the secret a secret for a long time.  You don’t know everything and won’t for a while.   

I’m not certain how much more I will show you.  Perhaps a bit more, but for entertainment and education’s sake.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Plans

14 October 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  How about as a hero?

Let me show you how to make Sorcha a zero.  We saw the initial scene, but there is always more.

September 1993, Saint Malo, France   

       Sorcha nodded, “Well said, sister.”  She encompassed them all in her glance, “Listen to me, all of you.  This situation isn’t exactly what it seems.  There are complexities for all of us.  The first is that Deidre, El, Laura, and I have commitments to the ecole and to this place.”

       Lady Glamis glared, “Political commitments?”

       “Family and educational commitments.”

       “Oh.”

       “Deidre and I are being finished, as are Laure and El.”

       “Finished.  What is finished?”

       Sorcha let out a sigh, “We are in training for our education politically and for our future lives.  Because of that, we are not at liberty to simply pick up and take you where you wish.  Our families and our honor would be at stake.  Secondly, I suspect any actions to help you escape would significantly prejudice Mother Roux against us.  It is imperative for our future that we remain students in good standing in her school and with the Mother Roux.”

       “Then I must do it all on my own.”

       “I am not suggesting that at all.  Is there any way you can enter the ecole or somehow connect with us directly or indirectly.”

       Lady Glamis snarled, “I have already secretly contacted you.  As citizens of Britany, you are my subjects and under my authority.”

       Sorcha continued, “Lady Glamis, the world has changed significantly during your captivity.  The best for you would be to learn about the modern world and learn how it works so you can make your way in it with us to help you.”

       “That all sounds very nice, but I’m the one cooped up in captivity here.”

       “Then let’s plan this all together.  We had not wanted anyone to know, but we four speak Breton.”

       El asked, “Why didn’t you want anyone to know?”

       Deidre threw out her hands, “It should be obvious.  We didn’t want any of the other girls to know we had any provincial roots.”

       Laura and El nodded, “Ah.”

       Sorcha rolled her eyes, “You see.  We are from Paris.  The others would hold us in contempt because of it.”

       El glanced down, “They do and they would.”

       Sorcha nodded, “We are not embarrassed by it, but we wanted to keep it under wraps.”

       Deidre whispered under her breath, “Not to mention, it is a breach of confidence.”

       Lady Glamis perked up, “What was that?”

       Sorcha glared at Deirdre, “Nothing.  Nothing at all.  The point is that at the moment, there are four here who could help you enter the ecole.”

       Lady Glamis cocked her head and squinted, “Enter the ecole.  I never thought of such a thing.”

       “You would have to be willing to put up with a very different situation.  You would need to be willing to learn some French.”

       “Never,” but the exclamation from Lady Glamis didn’t sound so certain.

       “Listen to me, Lady Glamis.  They have held you here in ignorance of the world around you.  To take your place, you must understand it to some degree.”

       Lady Glamis glanced at Sorcha, “And to do that I must learn the abominable tongue and acquiesce to their desires?”

       “To achieve your desires, yes, I would give you that advice.”

       “Then how am I to achieve this entry into the ecole?”

       “I suggest you ask an audience of Mother Roux.  She controls all here.  You should ask her if you can enter the ecole and interact with the students.  You should tell her that you wish to understand the world and fit yourself for it.”

       “What if she says no?”

       “Then continue to ask in a pleasant and Ladylike way.  Tell her you wish to equip yourself for today’s world.”

       Lady Glamis glanced to the side and scowled, “I’m afraid she will tell me I am unfit to enter her ecole.”

       “That may be true, but what else can you do?”

       “If she denies my petition?”

       “We can make plans for the future then.  During the Christmas holidays, Sorcha and I expect to return to Tours or Paris.  El and Laura will go to their homes.  Surely we can determine some means of helping you escape by then.  This is the beginning of October.  December is only a few months away.  If you can enter the school, you can learn to make your own way.  If you must wait a few more months, we can facilitate your escape.  In either case, you will be able to eventually return to Skipness.”

       Lady Glamis lowered her head in thought, “I must think on your proposals.  Let me give it some thought.  Let me see if the Mother Roux will grace me with an audience.”

       Deirdre remarked, “Whatever you do, don’t mention our names.  If you do, we are all compromised, and we will not be able to help you.”

       “Yes, yes, I see how that is.  I do like you all as friends.  I like the way your minds think.  I like your speech, and your manners.  What other leverage do I have against Mother Roux?  How might I force her to accept my petition?”

       Sorcha sat primly, “Do not force or demand.  Mother Roux will listen to reason, I think.  She is straightforward and thoughtful.  At first, she might not accede to your wishes, but I think she understands your position and power.  They no longer lock you away at night.  You already have the ability to leave when you desire it.  They either don’t fear you much, or they think you are not very dangerous to them.”

       “Am I dangerous to them?”

       “I think you are highly dangerous.”

       “Really?  That is something to think on.”

       Sorcha took a sip of her wine, “Try our proposals.  Do not incriminate us.  Do not mention us at all.  See if you can get into the ecole.  Act as if you are not dangerous at all.”

       “Yes, I see how this goes.  I’m willing to try it.  I do know something portentous is about to happen to me.”

       “How do you know that?”

       “Just as I knew you would visit me at the Fort and here in the cloister.  No one believes my prophecies, but they always come true.  Mother Roux will receive a visitor, or so I have seen.”

       They heard a gong.  Lady Glamis rose, “Now it is time for Nones.  The nuns will be occupied, and you may leave the way you came.”

       They all stood.

       Lady Glamis wrinkled her nose, “Your slippers are still wet.  Don’t put them on until you are safely away.”

       Sorcha glanced around, “Ladies, don’t leave anything that might give suspicion.”

       Lady Glamis nodded.

I haven’t shown you this part before.  This is part of the girls’ introduction to their new school.

I’m not certain how much more I will show you.  Perhaps a bit more, but for entertainment and education’s sake.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Still Unusual Tea Time

13 October 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  How about as a hero?

Let me show you how to make Sorcha a zero.  We saw the initial scene, but there is always more.

September 1993, Saint Malo, France   

       Lady Glamis took Deidre and Sorcha by the hand, “Welcome, friends.  I didn’t expect four of you, but I knew you were coming.  Please introduce me.”

       Sorcha quickly pulled her wits about her, “Lady Glamis, these are our friends, Elodie Da Silva and Laura Andre.  Ladies, this is the Lady Glamis.”

       At the names, Lady Glamis frowned, “They are French, are they not?”

       Sorcha grimaced, “They are our allies in Britany, and they are our friends.”

       Lady Glamis swept to the largest chair in the group and sat, “I should have warned you about bringing those types here.  I suspect they don’t speak a word of any cultured tongue.”

       Sorcha tried to smile, “They speak French.  It is true.”

       Laura put her hand over her heart and replied in Breton, “Lady Glamis, Elodie and I are from Brittany.  We speak a language similar to your own.”

       Lady Glamis face took on a more friendly aspect, “You can understand me.  You do indeed speak in a tongue I can understand and without that terrible accent the nuns all have.”

       Deidre sighed, “That is indeed a breach.  One that we may have to pay for, but it is a relief.”

       Elodie and Laura stared at her.

       Sorcha turned and made a face at them, “We’ll explain later.  My sister likes to joke.”

       El smiled and moved toward the Lady, “This is wonderful.  We thought no one here could speak our tongue.  It is very pleasant to hear it, and now to know that Sorcha and Deidre can also speak Breton.”

       The Lady Glamis nodded like a queen.  She made a gesture, “Come sit.  I prepared a small repast for you all.”

       The table held mugs, and wooden platters filled with sliced meat and cheeses and bread. 

       The Lady continued, “Please, sit.  Enjoy yourselves.  Place your footwear on the sill to dry and be comfortable.  I have longed for this.  I have lived for this.  Do you need a wrap?  Perhaps something else?”

       Sorcha placed her slippers on the sill and sat.  The others followed suit.  They sat around the oddly low table and waited breathlessly.  They weren’t sure for what.

       Finally, the Lady Glamis giggled, “I am a poor host.  She picked up her mug and lifted it, “I should eat and drink first.  You are very kind guests.”

       The others lifted their mugs.

       Lady Glamis took a deep drink and the others copied her.

       Their hands covered their mouths.  And they took another sip.

       Deidre whispered, “Is it wine?”

       Sorcha shrugged, “Some kind of wine.  It’s like nothing I’ve ever drunk before.”

       They all tasted the wine again.

       Lady Glamis reached for a piece of cheese.  The others looked around for utensils.  There were none, so they also used their hands.

       After a few moments, the Lady Glamis spoke, “Now that we know one another, have broken bread, and we all are friends, we must speak of something very important.”

       The girls, their mouths filled, leaned toward her.

       “We must speak of my escape.”

       Sorcha gagged.  Deidre almost spewed the contents of her mouth all over the table.  El and Laura gave the Lady a closer look.

       Laura asked, “Escape?  Escape from what?”

       The Lady Glamis sat up straight, “Why?  To escape from this terrible place.”

       Laura and El glanced at Sorcha and Deirdre.

       Sorcha grinned, “We have not planned an escape.  Why do you need us when you can easily leave the cloister when you wish?”

       “I told you before.  I wish to return to Skipness Castle.  I wish to return to Scotland.  That means I need a ship and warriors.”

       El stared at the Lady, “Actually, all you need is a ticket on the ferry from Saint Malo to Portsmouth.”

       Lady Glamis stared back.

       El stammered, “Of course you would need transportation from Portsmouth to Scotland, but there are trains, busses, and taxis.”

       Sorcha stood, “One moment, Lady Glamis.  We would love to take you immediately from here to Skipness Castle, but we are not in any position to accompany you, and I’m afraid it would compromise your situation and ours.”

       Lady Glamis looked puzzled, “I have never been thwarted by my own subjects in anything.”

       Deidre grumbled, “If that is true, you should insist the nuns of this cloister accompany you.”

       Lady Glamis blushed and turned her head, “You know that isn’t possible.  I’m a captive here.”

       El and Laura raised their eyes, “A captive?”

       “Yes.  A captive.  These nuns have held me here against my will for longer than I can fully comprehend.”

       Laura licked her lips, “Perhaps my father can help you.”

       Sorcha cried out, “Wait just one moment.  You are all talking cross purposes, and we need to keep any outside involvement to the minimum.  This is essential.”

       Deirdre seconded that, “Let’s discuss what we can accomplish and then determine what we must accomplish.” 

I haven’t shown you this part before.  This is part of the girls’ introduction to their new school.

Much of this revelation is to show you about the Lady Glamis and the girls: Sorcha, Deirdre, El, and Laura.  There are very strong nuances about all of them.  Most importantly, this is the second look at Lady Glamis.  

During the first revelation, Lady Glamis was off her norm.  She was outside her comfort zone and accosted by strangers.  They weren’t strangers to us, but to her.  In the current circumstance, Lady Glamis is in complete control of herself and her environment.  She is at ease, and acts in the main as she best does.  The problem is she is acting through ignorance.  She really doesn’t know anything about the world as it is.  This is something she must learn—or we shall see how she learns and how she adapts.

Second, there is an incredible problem for Sorcha and Deirdre.  They know now, immediately, their job is involved with the Lady Glamis.  They realize explicitly, their job is not allowing the Lady Glamis to escape back to England.  They know this could be a disaster.  Although they know their job is somehow involved with the Lady Glamis, it can’t be escape or return—there must be something else involved.

Third, although El and Laura have been indoctrinated, they can’t be allowed to help too much.  If the Lady Glamis gets away, Sorcha and Deirdre realize they might have a real problem.  They must figure out what they must do—its got to be a trick.

I’m not certain how much more I will show you.  Perhaps a bit more, but for entertainment and education’s sake.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Unusual Tea Time

12 October 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  How about as a hero?

Let me show you how to make Sorcha a zero.  We saw the initial scene, but there is always more.

September 1993, Saint Malo, France   

       Lady Glamis took Deidre and Sorcha by the hand, “Welcome, friends.  I didn’t expect four of you, but I knew you were coming.  Please introduce me.”

       Sorcha quickly pulled her wits about her, “Lady Glamis, these are our friends, Elodie Da Silva and Laura Andre.  Ladies, this is the Lady Glamis.”

       At the names, Lady Glamis frowned, “They are French, are they not?”

       Sorcha grimaced, “They are our allies in Britany, and they are our friends.”

       Lady Glamis swept to the largest chair in the group and sat, “I should have warned you about bringing those types here.  I suspect they don’t speak a word of any cultured tongue.”

       Sorcha tried to smile, “They speak French.  It is true.”

       Laura put her hand over her heart and replied in Breton, “Lady Glamis, Elodie and I are from Brittany.  We speak a language similar to your own.”

       Lady Glamis face took on a more friendly aspect, “You can understand me.  You do indeed speak in a tongue I can understand and without that terrible accent the nuns all have.”

       Deidre sighed, “That is indeed a breach.  One that we may have to pay for, but it is a relief.”

       Elodie and Laura stared at her.

       Sorcha turned and made a face at them, “We’ll explain later.  My sister likes to joke.”

       El smiled and moved toward the Lady, “This is wonderful.  We thought no one here could speak our tongue.  It is very pleasant to hear it, and now to know that Sorcha and Deidre can also speak Breton.”

       The Lady Glamis nodded like a queen.  She made a gesture, “Come sit.  I prepared a small repast for you all.”

       The table held mugs, and wooden platters filled with sliced meat and cheeses and bread. 

       The Lady continued, “Please, sit.  Enjoy yourselves.  Place your footwear on the sill to dry and be comfortable.  I have longed for this.  I have lived for this.  Do you need a wrap?  Perhaps something else?”

       Sorcha placed her slippers on the sill and sat.  The others followed suit.  They sat around the oddly low table and waited breathlessly.  They weren’t sure for what.

       Finally, the Lady Glamis giggled, “I am a poor host.  She picked up her mug and lifted it, “I should eat and drink first.  You are very kind guests.”

       The others lifted their mugs.

       Lady Glamis took a deep drink and the others copied her.

       Their hands covered their mouths.  And they took another sip.

       Deidre whispered, “Is it wine?”

       Sorcha shrugged, “Some kind of wine.  It’s like nothing I’ve ever drunk before.”

       They all tasted the wine again.

       Lady Glamis reached for a piece of cheese.  The others looked around for utensils.  There were none, so they also used their hands.

       After a few moments, the Lady Glamis spoke, “Now that we know one another, have broken bread, and we all are friends, we must speak of something very important.”

       The girls, their mouths filled, leaned toward her.

       “We must speak of my escape.”

       Sorcha gagged.  Deidre almost spewed the contents of her mouth all over the table.  El and Laura gave the Lady a closer look.

       Laura asked, “Escape?  Escape from what?”

       The Lady Glamis sat up straight, “Why?  To escape from this terrible place.”

       Laura and El glanced at Sorcha and Deirdre.

       Sorcha grinned, “We have not planned an escape.  Why do you need us when you can easily leave the cloister when you wish?”

       “I told you before.  I wish to return to Skipness Castle.  I wish to return to Scotland.  That means I need a ship and warriors.”

       El stared at the Lady, “Actually, all you need is a ticket on the ferry from Saint Malo to Portsmouth.”

       Lady Glamis stared back.

       El stammered, “Of course you would need transportation from Portsmouth to Scotland, but there are trains, busses, and taxis.”

       Sorcha stood, “One moment, Lady Glamis.  We would love to take you immediately from here to Skipness Castle, but we are not in any position to accompany you, and I’m afraid it would compromise your situation and ours.”

       Lady Glamis looked puzzled, “I have never been thwarted by my own subjects in anything.”

       Deidre grumbled, “If that is true, you should insist the nuns of this cloister accompany you.”

       Lady Glamis blushed and turned her head, “You know that isn’t possible.  I’m a captive here.”

       El and Laura raised their eyes, “A captive?”

       “Yes.  A captive.  These nuns have held me here against my will for longer than I can fully comprehend.”

       Laura licked her lips, “Perhaps my father can help you.”

       Sorcha cried out, “Wait just one moment.  You are all talking cross purposes, and we need to keep any outside involvement to the minimum.  This is essential.”

       Deirdre seconded that, “Let’s discuss what we can accomplish and then determine what we must accomplish.” 

I haven’t shown you this part before.  This is part of the girls’ introduction to their new school.

Now we are in for it.  I’ve showed you with before.  The Lady Glamis comes from England, actually Scotland in the 1500s.  At that time, England and France were not the best of friends.  Brittany was considered an outlaw state, but the language of Scotland and the Bretons was similar. 

Lady Glamis has a prejudice against Britany and France based on her culture and society.  She has also been held captive by the French for many many years, thus she is not enamored of the French.  El and Laura’s names are obviously French.  They do speak French, but they also speak Breton.  I set this up on purpose.  This is supposed to be a big reveal hidden in a bigger reveal.

Then Lady Glamis lowers the boom, so to speak—she wants to escape.  However, Lady Glamis doesn’t have any idea how to go about it, and she has isolated herself from others and from the world.  This is a real problem for her and for her friends.

We shall see how this works out.

I’m not certain how much more I will show you.  Perhaps a bit more, but for entertainment and education’s sake.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Unusual Tea Time

11 October 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  How about as a hero?

Let me show you how to make Sorcha a zero.  We saw the initial scene, but there is always more.

September 1993, Saint Malo, France   

       Lady Glamis took Deidre and Sorcha by the hand, “Welcome, friends.  I didn’t expect four of you, but I knew you were coming.  Please introduce me.”

       Sorcha quickly pulled her wits about her, “Lady Glamis, these are our friends, Elodie Da Silva and Laura Andre.  Ladies, this is the Lady Glamis.”

       At the names, Lady Glamis frowned, “They are French, are they not?”

       Sorcha grimaced, “They are our allies in Britany, and they are our friends.”

       Lady Glamis swept to the largest chair in the group and sat, “I should have warned you about bringing those types here.  I suspect they don’t speak a word of any cultured tongue.”

       Sorcha tried to smile, “They speak French.  It is true.”

       Laura put her hand over her heart and replied in Breton, “Lady Glamis, Elodie and I are from Brittany.  We speak a language similar to your own.”

       Lady Glamis face took on a more friendly aspect, “You can understand me.  You do indeed speak in a tongue I can understand and without that terrible accent the nuns all have.”

       Deidre sighed, “That is indeed a breach.  One that we may have to pay for, but it is a relief.”

       Elodie and Laura stared at her.

       Sorcha turned and made a face at them, “We’ll explain later.  My sister likes to joke.”

       El smiled and moved toward the Lady, “This is wonderful.  We thought no one here could speak our tongue.  It is very pleasant to hear it, and now to know that Sorcha and Deidre can also speak Breton.”

       The Lady Glamis nodded like a queen.  She made a gesture, “Come sit.  I prepared a small repast for you all.”

       The table held mugs, and wooden platters filled with sliced meat and cheeses and bread. 

       The Lady continued, “Please, sit.  Enjoy yourselves.  Place your footwear on the sill to dry and be comfortable.  I have longed for this.  I have lived for this.  Do you need a wrap?  Perhaps something else?”

       Sorcha placed her slippers on the sill and sat.  The others followed suit.  They sat around the oddly low table and waited breathlessly.  They weren’t sure for what.

       Finally, the Lady Glamis giggled, “I am a poor host.  She picked up her mug and lifted it, “I should eat and drink first.  You are very kind guests.”

       The others lifted their mugs.

       Lady Glamis took a deep drink and the others copied her.

       Their hands covered their mouths.  And they took another sip.

       Deidre whispered, “Is it wine?”

       Sorcha shrugged, “Some kind of wine.  It’s like nothing I’ve ever drunk before.”

       They all tasted the wine again.

       Lady Glamis reached for a piece of cheese.  The others looked around for utensils.  There were none, so they also used their hands.

       After a few moments, the Lady Glamis spoke, “Now that we know one another, have broken bread, and we all are friends, we must speak of something very important.”

       The girls, their mouths filled, leaned toward her.

       “We must speak of my escape.”

       Sorcha gagged.  Deidre almost spewed the contents of her mouth all over the table.  El and Laura gave the Lady a closer look.

       Laura asked, “Escape?  Escape from what?”

       The Lady Glamis sat up straight, “Why?  To escape from this terrible place.”

       Laura and El glanced at Sorcha and Deirdre.

       Sorcha grinned, “We have not planned an escape.  Why do you need us when you can easily leave the cloister when you wish?”

       “I told you before.  I wish to return to Skipness Castle.  I wish to return to Scotland.  That means I need a ship and warriors.”

       El stared at the Lady, “Actually, all you need is a ticket on the ferry from Saint Malo to Portsmouth.”

       Lady Glamis stared back.

       El stammered, “Of course you would need transportation from Portsmouth to Scotland, but there are trains, busses, and taxis.”

       Sorcha stood, “One moment, Lady Glamis.  We would love to take you immediately from here to Skipness Castle, but we are not in any position to accompany you, and I’m afraid it would compromise your situation and ours.”

       Lady Glamis looked puzzled, “I have never been thwarted by my own subjects in anything.”

       Deidre grumbled, “If that is true, you should insist the nuns of this cloister accompany you.”

       Lady Glamis blushed and turned her head, “You know that isn’t possible.  I’m a captive here.”

       El and Laura raised their eyes, “A captive?”

       “Yes.  A captive.  These nuns have held me here against my will for longer than I can fully comprehend.”

       Laura licked her lips, “Perhaps my father can help you.”

       Sorcha cried out, “Wait just one moment.  You are all talking cross purposes, and we need to keep any outside involvement to the minimum.  This is essential.”

       Deirdre seconded that, “Let’s discuss what we can accomplish and then determine what we must accomplish.” 

I haven’t shown you this part before.  This is part of the girls’ introduction to their new school.

I’m not certain how much more I will show you.  Perhaps a bit more, but for entertainment and education’s sake.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Tea Time

10 October 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  How about as a hero?

Let me show you how to make Sorcha a zero.  We saw the initial scene, but there is always more.

September 1993, Saint Malo, France   

       El gave a bitten off scream.  Laura Jumped back.  Sorcha slapped her hand over El’s mouth.  Deidre stepped back on the stairs and slipped.  Lady Glamis reached from the other side of the door and grasped Deidre’s hand.  She pulled her up and held her.

       With a large smile she laughed, and in a voice that brooked no defiance, stated, “I knew you were coming.  Quickly, up the stairs and follow me.”

       Sorcha pulled El and Laura with her.  Deidre stood with her mouth open.  All their slippers squeaked, filled with water and sand.

       Lady Glamis glanced down at their feet, “Take them off.  You’re leaving a trail even a stupid nun could follow.  Quickly.”

       They all pulled off their slippers and followed the girl into an empty kitchen and down a long carpeted hallway with windows along one side to another set of stone stairs.  The stairs were covered with fine oriental style carpets just like the hall. Lady Glamis motioned them to follow and led them to another long windowed hallway at the top.  The Lady led them to a large door near the center of the hall and threw it open.  She pulled each of them inside and closed and bolted the door behind them.

       They stood in a magnificent room with large ancient paned glass at one end.  The room was huge.  At the side was a large canopied bed like the kind you find in medieval castles.  On the other lay a wall length hearth like a medieval fireplace.  The bed looked much shorter and wider than any bed you might find today.  It had drawers that Deidre knew were closet beds, and it stood higher than any bed she had ever seen.  A short set of wooden steps led up to the top.  On every other side were bookshelves filled with books and scrolls.  The books looked like they came out of a museum.  The spaces between the shelves were filled with tapestries like those you found in royal dwellings.  In any other bare spots were hung shields, pikes, and swords.  At the side of the room opposite the bed and under the windows lay heavy tables and chairs like those you might find in a castle.  The chairs were like nothing from the modern world.  They were large and tapestry covered.  The table was solid wood and polished to a blazing shine, but it wasn’t finished like anything they had seen except in movies or in a museum. 

I haven’t shown you this part before.  This is part of the girls’ introduction to their new school.

This is supposed to show with description the differences between the world the girls left and the one they have entered.  The Cloister is different than the ecole, but this place (room) is significantly different than anything except a museum.  That’s the point I’m making here.

There is more to glean from this simple section.  Mainly, Lady Glamis was ready for them.  They meet no nuns.  They aren’t caught.  This will come into play later, but this should be evident from the narrative.  The Lady Glamis is still concerned about discovery, but by discovery through means she can’t or doesn’t control. 

What I want you to note is the power Lady Glamis wields and the power she doesn’t wield.  We shall see more of this.

I’m not certain how much more I will show you.  Perhaps a bit more, but for entertainment and education’s sake.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Come to Tea

9 October 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  How about as a hero?

Let me show you how to make Sorcha a zero.  We saw the initial scene, but there is always more.

September 1993, Saint Malo, France   

       El gave a bitten off scream.  Laura Jumped back.  Sorcha slapped her hand over El’s mouth.  Deidre stepped back on the stairs and slipped.  Lady Glamis reached from the other side of the door and grasped Deidre’s hand.  She pulled her up and held her.

       With a large smile she laughed, and in a voice that brooked no defiance, stated, “I knew you were coming.  Quickly, up the stairs and follow me.”

       Sorcha pulled El and Laura with her.  Deidre stood with her mouth open.  All their slippers squeaked, filled with water and sand.

       Lady Glamis glanced down at their feet, “Take them off.  You’re leaving a trail even a stupid nun could follow.  Quickly.”

       They all pulled off their slippers and followed the girl into an empty kitchen and down a long carpeted hallway with windows along one side to another set of stone stairs.  The stairs were covered with fine oriental style carpets just like the hall. Lady Glamis motioned them to follow and led them to another long windowed hallway at the top.  The Lady led them to a large door near the center of the hall and threw it open.  She pulled each of them inside and closed and bolted the door behind them.

       They stood in a magnificent room with large ancient paned glass at one end.  The room was huge.  At the side was a large canopied bed like the kind you find in medieval castles.  On the other lay a wall length hearth like a medieval fireplace.  The bed looked much shorter and wider than any bed you might find today.  It had drawers that Deidre knew were closet beds, and it stood higher than any bed she had ever seen.  A short set of wooden steps led up to the top.  On every other side were bookshelves filled with books and scrolls.  The books looked like they came out of a museum.  The spaces between the shelves were filled with tapestries like those you found in royal dwellings.  In any other bare spots were hung shields, pikes, and swords.  At the side of the room opposite the bed and under the windows lay heavy tables and chairs like those you might find in a castle.  The chairs were like nothing from the modern world.  They were large and tapestry covered.  The table was solid wood and polished to a blazing shine, but it wasn’t finished like anything they had seen except in movies or in a museum. 

I haven’t shown you this part before.  This is part of the girls’ introduction to their new school.

I’m not certain how much more I will show you.  Perhaps a bit more, but for entertainment and education’s sake.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Meeting

8 October 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  How about as a hero?

Let me show you how to make Sorcha a zero.  We saw the initial scene, but there is always more.

September 1993, Saint Malo, France   

       Deidre pushed the trapdoor the rest of the way open and climbed into the room.  Laura, El, and Sorcha followed her. 

       They stood in a stone walled cellar very similar to the one in the kitchen of the ecole.  This one appeared to be well used.  Old wooden shelves covered most of the walls, and on them were arranged jars, bottles, and sacks of what appeared to be food stuffs.  Onions, leaks, and garlic hung from the rafters.  Barrels of wine or other liquids and foods filled the back and niches in the place.  At the end directly facing the trapdoor lay a stone stairwell going up.  The floor was set stone clear of any sand or debris and the trapdoor was reinforced wood and looked solid and well kept.

       Sorcha whispered, “No reason to hide this entrance or exit.”

       Deidre moved toward the stairs.  She took cautious steps until she reached the bottom, “Sorcha, why don’t you make another sending?”

       Sorcha moved up to her and put out her hands.  After a moment, she reported, “Nothing that I can touch.”

       El jumped, “Touch?”

       Deirdre nodded and moved up the stairs.  She stopped at the door at the top and listened for a long moment, then she reached for the ancient handle.  She pressed it down and cracked open the door.  No one moved.

       The door was pulled out of Deidre’s hands and opened suddenly.

       El gave a bitten off scream.  Laura Jumped back.  Sorcha slapped her hand over El’s mouth.  Deidre stepped back on the stairs and slipped.  Lady Glamis reached from the other side of the door and grasped Deidre’s hand.  She pulled her up and held her.

       With a large smile she laughed, and in a voice that brooked no defiance, stated, “I knew you were coming.  Quickly, up the stairs and follow me.”

I haven’t shown you this part before.  This is part of the girls’ introduction to their new school.

Here we have the meeting with Cassandra on her own turf.  If you remember, she told Sorcha and Deirdre, they were coming to visit her.  It still surprises us when she greets them with just that message.  “I knew you were coming.”

Why would this be important.  As I’ve written over and over, I write using a reflected worldview.  The moment, I mentioned the name, Lady Glamis, you could have looked up the Lady Glamis and when I showed you (Lady Glamis told you in dialog) she was the daughter of the Lady Glamis, you could have figured out all about her potential life and past.  Now, because this Lady Glamis is made up, I still have to give you the details, but this is an unknown or unaccounted offspring of Janet Douglas. 

Further, the moment I showed you her actual name is Cassandra (this I confessed in this blog), you could look up Cassandra and know Cassandra was a Greek priestess cursed to tell true prophecies but never be believed.   There is much more to this cursed girl that I haven’t revealed to you, but perhaps I shall—this is fun.

I’m not certain how much more I will show you.  Perhaps a bit more, but for entertainment and education’s sake.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Discovery

7 October 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  How about as a hero?

Let me show you how to make Sorcha a zero.  We saw the initial scene, but there is always more.

September 1993, Saint Malo, France   

       Deidre pushed the trapdoor the rest of the way open and climbed into the room.  Laura, El, and Sorcha followed her. 

       They stood in a stone walled cellar very similar to the one in the kitchen of the ecole.  This one appeared to be well used.  Old wooden shelves covered most of the walls, and on them were arranged jars, bottles, and sacks of what appeared to be food stuffs.  Onions, leaks, and garlic hung from the rafters.  Barrels of wine or other liquids and foods filled the back and niches in the place.  At the end directly facing the trapdoor lay a stone stairwell going up.  The floor was set stone clear of any sand or debris and the trapdoor was reinforced wood and looked solid and well kept.

       Sorcha whispered, “No reason to hide this entrance or exit.”

       Deidre moved toward the stairs.  She took cautious steps until she reached the bottom, “Sorcha, why don’t you make another sending?”

       Sorcha moved up to her and put out her hands.  After a moment, she reported, “Nothing that I can touch.”

       El jumped, “Touch?”

       Deirdre nodded and moved up the stairs.  She stopped at the door at the top and listened for a long moment, then she reached for the ancient handle.  She pressed it down and cracked open the door.  No one moved.

       The door was pulled out of Deidre’s hands and opened suddenly.

       El gave a bitten off scream.  Laura Jumped back.  Sorcha slapped her hand over El’s mouth.  Deidre stepped back on the stairs and slipped.  Lady Glamis reached from the other side of the door and grasped Deidre’s hand.  She pulled her up and held her.

       With a large smile she laughed, and in a voice that brooked no defiance, stated, “I knew you were coming.  Quickly, up the stairs and follow me.”

I haven’t shown you this part before.  This is part of the girls’ introduction to their new school.

I’m not certain how much more I will show you.  Perhaps a bit more, but for entertainment and education’s sake.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment