Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Literary Romantic

25 September 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

How do we gain the skills to write well?  Let’s begin with reading.  Reading allows us to understand the following:

 

  1. What a novel is.
  2. How a novel is constructed.
  3. How a novel is entertaining.
  4. How a novel is written.
  5. How novels have evolved.
  6. Different genre in novels.

 

Here is the list of genres that are reflective of the current market for modern novels:

 

  1. Romance
  2. Action Adventure
  3. Science Fiction
  4. Fantasy
  5. Speculative Fiction
  6. Suspense/Thriller
  7. Young Adult
  8. New Adult
  9. Horror/Paranormal/Ghost
  10. Mystery/Crime
  11. Police Procedurals
  12. Historical
  13. Westerns
  14. Family Saga
  15. Women’s Fiction
  16. Magic Realism
  17. Literary Fiction
  18. Dystopian

 

So what does a romance romantic character look like?  Let’s start with our list of romantic characteristics:

 

  1. The common man, innocence of humans, and childhood (children)
  2. Focus on strong senses, emotions, and feelings
  3. Awe of nature
  4. Celebration of the individual and individualism
  5. Importance of imagination

 

Okay, I’ll say it—the truth.  I think so called literary fiction is not as popular today because it has rejected romantic characters.  What it has replaced the romantic ideal with is hard to say.  It has replaced the entertaining with the unentertaining—and that is that.

 

Literary fiction has lost popularity because it is not entertaining.  How can this be?  What exactly is literary fiction?  I think I write literary fiction.  My writing is filled with classical quotes, analogies, figures of speech of all kinds, puns, jokes, literary references, art references, and sometimes allegory.  This is classically what we call literary fiction.  All the literary features I place in my novels are not necessary to understand the novel.  In fact, if something is necessary and is classical, I explain it in the context of the novel.  This way I entertain and don’t lose my readers.  I have never had the unclassically trained complain that my novels are too difficult to understand.

 

I have had the classically trained ask me why I waste my time for those who will likely never understand.  It is for those who see the depth of the writing in my novels.  I have readers who say they read my novels over and over and get something new at each reading.  This is what I am aiming for—not a new awareness of the theme or plot, but a new awareness of the depth of the novel.  I think this is part of the romantic ideal.  I also think this is the way all great novels should be written.

 

As Aristotle and Socrates noted, in the catharsis of creativity that causes the invention of every work of literary art, the mind explodes with creativity outputting ideas from the psyche.  In fact, because of the nature of writing, the author is going from ideas to words to symbols on paper—the only means to convey the original thoughts are through the abstract—this is why figures of speech are so important.  They turn ideas into thoughts and especially feelings that represent the world to the reader.  Literary might be dead, killed by pretentious authors who aren’t interested in entertaining their readers.  But is should live again in strong classical writing that does entertain and excite a new generation of readers—as just another subgenre.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Magic Realism Romantic

24 September 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

How do we gain the skills to write well?  Let’s begin with reading.  Reading allows us to understand the following:

 

  1. What a novel is.
  2. How a novel is constructed.
  3. How a novel is entertaining.
  4. How a novel is written.
  5. How novels have evolved.
  6. Different genre in novels.

 

Here is the list of genres that are reflective of the current market for modern novels:

 

  1. Romance
  2. Action Adventure
  3. Science Fiction
  4. Fantasy
  5. Speculative Fiction
  6. Suspense/Thriller
  7. Young Adult
  8. New Adult
  9. Horror/Paranormal/Ghost
  10. Mystery/Crime
  11. Police Procedurals
  12. Historical
  13. Westerns
  14. Family Saga
  15. Women’s Fiction
  16. Magic Realism
  17. Literary Fiction
  18. Dystopian

 

So what does a romance romantic character look like?  Let’s start with our list of romantic characteristics:

 

  1. The common man, innocence of humans, and childhood (children)
  2. Focus on strong senses, emotions, and feelings
  3. Awe of nature
  4. Celebration of the individual and individualism
  5. Importance of imagination

 

Magic realism is not new, but it is newly recognized as a genre.  The result of Harry Potty.  There has been a lot of magic realism novels in the world, but not until Harry Potty did it break out of the fantasy genre on its own.

 

The problem with calling a novel magic realism is that magic realism is supposed to be normalized.  It isn’t normalized when it becomes acknowledged.  My novels are filled with magic realism, but that’s not what I call it.  I call it reflection of a view of the world.  What I mean by that is that society has many myths like magic, magical and supernatural creatures, and gods.  These are all historical myths—placing them in a novel simply reflects an existing human view of the world.  Magic realism may or may not reflect this existing mythus.  But what about characters in magic realism?

 

I’d say like any fantasy or science fiction, a romantic character in magic realism is the most entertaining type of character.  Harry Potty is kind of an example of this.  I write “kind of” because Harry Potty is a pretty defective attempt at a romantic character.  Not that Harry doesn’t try to be a romantic character, but he is a born messiah hidden as a common man, kind of a man in an iron mask.  Plus, he has almost no imagination.  He isn’t a deep thinking character, plus his emotions and feelings are more important than his thoughts and imagination.  The example is that he doesn’t invent any spells.

 

Although not mentioned in the list above, a romantic character should obviously be a creative human being—that goes along with individual, emotions, and imagination.  The assumption of romanticism is intelligent and creative.  That’s mainly why I call Harry defective.  In your magic realism, you should seek to develop a romantic protagonist, but they should be creative, intelligent, and individualistic.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Woman’s Fiction Romantic

23 September 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

How do we gain the skills to write well?  Let’s begin with reading.  Reading allows us to understand the following:

 

  1. What a novel is.
  2. How a novel is constructed.
  3. How a novel is entertaining.
  4. How a novel is written.
  5. How novels have evolved.
  6. Different genre in novels.

 

Here is the list of genres that are reflective of the current market for modern novels:

 

  1. Romance
  2. Action Adventure
  3. Science Fiction
  4. Fantasy
  5. Speculative Fiction
  6. Suspense/Thriller
  7. Young Adult
  8. New Adult
  9. Horror/Paranormal/Ghost
  10. Mystery/Crime
  11. Police Procedurals
  12. Historical
  13. Westerns
  14. Family Saga
  15. Women’s Fiction
  16. Magic Realism
  17. Literary Fiction
  18. Dystopian

 

So what does a romance romantic character look like?  Let’s start with our list of romantic characteristics:

 

  1. The common man, innocence of humans, and childhood (children)
  2. Focus on strong senses, emotions, and feelings
  3. Awe of nature
  4. Celebration of the individual and individualism
  5. Importance of imagination

 

One of the big complaints about early romantic literature and indeed literature in general is the lack of strongly romantic female protagonists.  Woman’s fiction is the ideal means to reduce this complaint, but one of the best ways to continue it.

 

The reason for so few strongly woman protagonists is that the early writers in romanticism were women and women apparently like to write about strong male romantic characters.  Look at Pride and Prejudice, Wuthering Heights, and about any of the other Bronte sister novels.  Their male characters are either moving toward the romantic or strongly romantic.  We didn’t see many female romantic characters until the modern era.

 

I write, use, and develop strongly romantic female characters and protagonists.  I think they make wonderful protagonists and strongly pathos building romantic characters.  I don’t write woman’s fiction.

 

In any case, if you take the romantic characteristics and apply them to a woman’s fiction protagonist, you will make a highly entertaining female protagonist.  I don’t need to go into details again for this genre of literature.  I should point out that historically, woman writers have intentionally placed their characters in different than romantic roles or romantic idioms.  For example, the Bronte sisters making their male protagonists or antagonists strongly romantic while expressing their female characters as more congenial and normal Victorian characters.  Woman’s fiction authors should be aware of this and ensure their characters are romantic.  I think this leads to the most entertaining writing.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Family Saga Romantic

22 September 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

How do we gain the skills to write well?  Let’s begin with reading.  Reading allows us to understand the following:

 

  1. What a novel is.
  2. How a novel is constructed.
  3. How a novel is entertaining.
  4. How a novel is written.
  5. How novels have evolved.
  6. Different genre in novels.

 

Here is the list of genres that are reflective of the current market for modern novels:

 

  1. Romance
  2. Action Adventure
  3. Science Fiction
  4. Fantasy
  5. Speculative Fiction
  6. Suspense/Thriller
  7. Young Adult
  8. New Adult
  9. Horror/Paranormal/Ghost
  10. Mystery/Crime
  11. Police Procedurals
  12. Historical
  13. Westerns
  14. Family Saga
  15. Women’s Fiction
  16. Magic Realism
  17. Literary Fiction
  18. Dystopian

 

So what does a romance romantic character look like?  Let’s start with our list of romantic characteristics:

 

  1. The common man, innocence of humans, and childhood (children)
  2. Focus on strong senses, emotions, and feelings
  3. Awe of nature
  4. Celebration of the individual and individualism
  5. Importance of imagination

 

Family saga, meh, this is apparently an important modern genre, but I’m not sure how important or popular it is.  If you write in this genre and are close to this type of writing, I wish you well.  The question I’d like to answer is what type of protagonist fits the best in this genre of literature.

 

I’m of the opinion that a reflexive, of course a romantic protagonist is the best, is a reasonable answer.  However, this may not be entirely correct.  Perhaps we should look at how a romantic protagonist looks in a family saga.

 

A family saga fits very well in the idea of the common man origin, human innocence, and childhood.  Family saga usually means children—the first characteristic matches.

 

I’d argue that all modern literature should reflect strong senses, emotions, and feelings.  This works well in a family saga genre due to the very nature of the theme and subject.  The feelings of the family are paramount in these types of novels.

 

Awe of nature is a focus and a setting—it fits in most every genre, but celebration of the individual and individualism isn’t really a good fit for a family saga.  Now, dependent on the character of the protagonist, individualism and the individual could match well in a family saga.  In other words, the family might be driven by individualism.

 

The importance of the imagination is critical in romanticism and always to be found in a family saga.

 

So, yeah, I’d use a romantic protagonist and a romantic theme in a family saga.  I think that would provide a very entertaining piece of writing.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, more Western Romantic

21 September 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

How do we gain the skills to write well?  Let’s begin with reading.  Reading allows us to understand the following:

 

  1. What a novel is.
  2. How a novel is constructed.
  3. How a novel is entertaining.
  4. How a novel is written.
  5. How novels have evolved.
  6. Different genre in novels.

 

Here is the list of genres that are reflective of the current market for modern novels:

 

  1. Romance
  2. Action Adventure
  3. Science Fiction
  4. Fantasy
  5. Speculative Fiction
  6. Suspense/Thriller
  7. Young Adult
  8. New Adult
  9. Horror/Paranormal/Ghost
  10. Mystery/Crime
  11. Police Procedurals
  12. Historical
  13. Westerns
  14. Family Saga
  15. Women’s Fiction
  16. Magic Realism
  17. Literary Fiction
  18. Dystopian

 

So what does a romance romantic character look like?  Let’s start with our list of romantic characteristics:

 

  1. The common man, innocence of humans, and childhood (children)
  2. Focus on strong senses, emotions, and feelings
  3. Awe of nature
  4. Celebration of the individual and individualism
  5. Importance of imagination

 

The western screams for a romantic protagonist.  As a matter of a fact, I’ll not go on the ropes to state that the western protagonist might have been one of the key steps in the development of the romantic character, but it certainly accelerated the process.  The penny novel fiction of the turn of the twentieth century certainly had a lot to do with the beginnings of the romantic era and the romantic character.  Just look at Edgar Rice Burroughs.  ERB wrote more than one western and his characters are all romantic archetypes.

 

The western protagonist comes out of the common wheal.  He is a man or woman of strong control but deep seated emotions.  If you remember, the purpose of emotions that is senses, emotions, and feelings in romantic literature isn’t the protagonist but the reader, you will get the point.

 

The awe of nature is explicit in every western.  You can’t have the west without large spaces, huge skies, and limitless land.  The individual is the definition of the western protagonist.  He is Shane riding alone into the sunset.  Imagination might seem to be an odd characteristic of the western mind and the western novel, but think about it—imagination goes with the limitless horizon and the individual seeking ever for a place to set up camp.  Hopefully and eventually a permanent homestead, but that is always denied the western protagonist, or almost always.  He or she is an individual.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, more Historical Romantic

20 September 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

How do we gain the skills to write well?  Let’s begin with reading.  Reading allows us to understand the following:

 

  1. What a novel is.
  2. How a novel is constructed.
  3. How a novel is entertaining.
  4. How a novel is written.
  5. How novels have evolved.
  6. Different genre in novels.

 

Here is the list of genres that are reflective of the current market for modern novels:

 

  1. Romance
  2. Action Adventure
  3. Science Fiction
  4. Fantasy
  5. Speculative Fiction
  6. Suspense/Thriller
  7. Young Adult
  8. New Adult
  9. Horror/Paranormal/Ghost
  10. Mystery/Crime
  11. Police Procedurals
  12. Historical
  13. Westerns
  14. Family Saga
  15. Women’s Fiction
  16. Magic Realism
  17. Literary Fiction
  18. Dystopian

 

So what does a romance romantic character look like?  Let’s start with our list of romantic characteristics:

 

  1. The common man, innocence of humans, and childhood (children)
  2. Focus on strong senses, emotions, and feelings
  3. Awe of nature
  4. Celebration of the individual and individualism
  5. Importance of imagination

 

A romantic character developed from history usually is not the primary historical figure.  I’ll use my novel Centurion and the character Abenadar.  Abenadar is the centurion who oversaw the execution of Christ.  My novel is about his life, and shows the crucifixion from the Roman and Jewish standpoint.  Adenadar is not one of the primaries in the history of the times.  He is indeed an important figure, but not the most important figure.  This enables the writer to build a strong romantic character.

 

Actual people in history are generally not perfect enough nor predictable enough to produce a romantic character.  There are a few examples, but they aren’t necessarily as interesting to write about as are those who support and defend those great characters.  For example, you might be able to make a romantic character from Joan of Arc, Christ, Gandhi, and the list is suddenly very short.  Romantic characters are not perfect, but they are archetypes for human perfection.  The real usually gets in the way of the true.

 

The point of the romantic character is to entertain.  Much of history isn’t that entertaining.  The events in history and the focus on a character in history provides the entertainment, but again, the reality sometimes won’t support a primary from history as a romantic character.

 

This is what I recommend.  If you write historical fiction, as I do, then base your characters not on principles from history, but rather secondary characters you can pluck from history and develop into a romantic character or characters you add to history as participants.

 

This is exactly what I did with Centurion.  I plucked the Centurion Abenadar from history and developed him as a romantic character.  I could do this because we don’t know all that much about the real Abenadar.  Likewise, for my Ancient Light novels, my characters are developed romantic creations whom I placed into the history of the Twentieth Century.  They are participants and onlookers.  You might develop a great romantic character from a principle in history who is not well documented or known, but using secondary historical characters or developed new individuals seems to be the best for a romantic protagonist.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Historical Romantic

19 September 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

How do we gain the skills to write well?  Let’s begin with reading.  Reading allows us to understand the following:

 

  1. What a novel is.
  2. How a novel is constructed.
  3. How a novel is entertaining.
  4. How a novel is written.
  5. How novels have evolved.
  6. Different genre in novels.

 

Here is the list of genres that are reflective of the current market for modern novels:

 

  1. Romance
  2. Action Adventure
  3. Science Fiction
  4. Fantasy
  5. Speculative Fiction
  6. Suspense/Thriller
  7. Young Adult
  8. New Adult
  9. Horror/Paranormal/Ghost
  10. Mystery/Crime
  11. Police Procedurals
  12. Historical
  13. Westerns
  14. Family Saga
  15. Women’s Fiction
  16. Magic Realism
  17. Literary Fiction
  18. Dystopian

 

So what does a romance romantic character look like?  Let’s start with our list of romantic characteristics:

 

  1. The common man, innocence of humans, and childhood (children)
  2. Focus on strong senses, emotions, and feelings
  3. Awe of nature
  4. Celebration of the individual and individualism
  5. Importance of imagination

 

I’m going to skill police procedurals because, for the life of me, I can’t figure out the difference from mystery and crime.  Let’s move on to historical.

 

The historical protagonist usually fits well in the romantic mold because most figures worth historical recognition either are or do remarkable things—either can be used to build a romantic protagonist.  I will warn you, some characters from history can’t be made into very effective romantic characters—this is true especially of modern historical heroes of a certain persuasion.  Men and women of an ambivalent nature who really have no skills or imagination or those whose imagination leads to social, cultural, or real death shouldn’t be romantic characters.  Robespierre, Mao, Hitler, Castro, Stalin, Lenin, and other similar horrific dictators would make terrible romantic characters.  On the ambivalent side: Chamberlin, most politicians, criminals, those who take both sides of an issue, traitors, and others that I won’t mention, just don’t have the positive energy of decisive character to make a romantic character.

 

A romantic character must be sure from the core of his or her being that he is right and he or she must be able to encourage others to succeed.  There is more about this type of character in history.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment