Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, The Protagonist

25 February 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The point of the rising action and of the overall novel is to reveal the protagonist as well as the action of the protagonist in resolving the telic flaw.  They are basically the same thing.  This is all about secrets.

If you remember, fiction writing is all about entertainment.  That’s all there is.  We make secrets and relationships entertaining by creating tension.

Every scene has some degree of a tension buildup (rising action) and release (climax). 

It’s all about the protagonist—literally.  The protagonist is the beginning and the end of everything in the novel.  Everything comes from the protagonist and ends with the protagonist.  If this isn’t true in your novel, you are either writing it wrong or you picked the wrong person to be the protagonist. 

The protagonist determines the telic flaw and the setting, and everything falls out of these.  As I noted, literally everything in a novel comes out of the protagonist.  Let’s get more into this, next.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, The Climax

24 February 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The point of the rising action and of the overall novel is to reveal the protagonist as well as the action of the protagonist in resolving the telic flaw.  They are basically the same thing.  This is all about secrets.

If you remember, fiction writing is all about entertainment.  That’s all there is.  We make secrets and relationships entertaining by creating tension.

Every scene has some degree of a tension buildup (rising action) and release (climax). 

The climax is critical to a novel, but it isn’t the power of the novel.  For me, the climax just comes.  There are obvious reasons for this.  The telic flaw of the novel is resolved by the climax.  This is a must do and must be. 

Now, an author can choose a poor telic flaw and have a weak climax, but the climax rarely sells your novel, not to readers or to publishers.  As a reader, I have never picked up a novel and skimmed through it to find the climax.  I don’t think I’ve ever read a review where the reviewer wrote the novel was wonderful, but the climax was terrible. 

Climaxes just happen.  If you have a good telic flaw and a good protagonist, the climax will just happen.  In fact, I’ll go back and remind you.  The part of your novel that sells the novel to both readers and publishers is the initial scene.  This is as far as most readers get when deciding to buy your novel.  The publisher looks deeper, but most of the time, the novel is sold by the end of the first scene.  Many publishers ask for up to three chapters, but that’s just to check for flukes—they want to know if you can keep it up for more than a single initial scene. 

If I were a publisher, I would just need the initial scene.  That tells me whether I want to read or buy a novel.  The rest is gravy.  If an author creates an interesting protagonist, a setting, and a telic flaw to be resolved, that’s the initial scene, and that tells me if I’m interested in the revelation of the protagonist.  For me, it’s all about the protagonist.  The climax is important, but who cares when the protagonist is so interesting.  I’ve mentioned this before.  For the well-read, the climax just begins the process of saying goodbye.  Who wants to say goodbye to a new friend?  Perhaps we should look at the protagonist again.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, And then there is the Climax

23 February 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The point of the rising action and of the overall novel is to reveal the protagonist as well as the action of the protagonist in resolving the telic flaw.  They are basically the same thing.  This is all about secrets.

If you remember, fiction writing is all about entertainment.  That’s all there is.  We make secrets and relationships entertaining by creating tension.

Every scene has some degree of a tension buildup (rising action) and release (climax). 

The climax comes but once in a novel—tension and release must fill each scene.  If you wondered why I emphasize tension and release that is why.  You can write a poor climax in a great revelation novel and few will notice.  The climax is important, but not nearly as important as the initial scene or the rising action.

The initial scene sells your novel.  The rising action is your novel. 

Now, I advise and desire every novel to have a great and powerful climax, but the climax just tells me that the novel I’m loving to read is coming to an end (or the terrible novel I’m reading is thankfully coming to an end). 

As I keep writing for you—novels are about the revelation of the protagonist.  If the protagonist is interesting and exciting, the reader will be excited from page one.  The climax might be a letdown.  For example, one of my favorite novels and examples is A Little Princess about Sara Crew from the Victorian Era.  The climax is great, but it is nearly anti-climactic compared to the rest of the novel.  It does tell us our time with Sara is coming to an end.  It is a wonderful climax for the novel, but it is also a letdown.  Our adventures and intimacy with Sara are coming to an end. Sara’s adventures and her excitement are coming to an end. 

The climax is critical to a novel, but it isn’t the power of the novel.  More on this, next.    

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Tension and Release and Scene Development

22 February 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The point of the rising action and of the overall novel is to reveal the protagonist as well as the action of the protagonist in resolving the telic flaw.  They are basically the same thing.  This is all about secrets.

If you remember, fiction writing is all about entertainment.  That’s all there is.  We make secrets and relationships entertaining by creating tension.

Every scene has some degree of a tension buildup (rising action) and release (climax). 

I’m not in favor of looking at scenes like short stories, although some authors are very effective using this technique.  What I recommend is looking at the scene as a cohesive whole, but not separate from the novel, with some degree of tension and release unique to that specific scene.  This is very difficult to fully explain without looking at specific examples, but I’ll try and then perhaps give an example.

First, let me repeat the scene outline from above:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

This scene outline is supposed to help with scene development in a novel.  Perhaps the most difficult part of the development is output and tension and release development.  I do think all three of these can be bounded and designed easily in the context of your writing.  The trick is to figure out how with every scene and in each novel.

The scene outline gives direct advice and hints.  Look at step three.  Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution—and develop the tension and release. 

The first question is where is the scene going?  Much of this comes from the input and the setting.  If your characters are going to a castle to explore it (input and setting) then what is the outcome?  In my novel about Sorcha and Deirdre, they were going to explore a supposedly “haunted house” out in the country with their friends.  That is the input and the setting.  The outcome, I had already determined: Deirdre would meet and engage a Fae creature.  Part of the scene development was the research and design of the creature.  I already had a Bean-tighe in mind from my previous research and reading.  Further research just solidified my choice.  This became the center point for the tension and release in the scene, and then the center point for some tension and release in future scenes. 

The point is to use the creative elements you have already in the novel and to design new ones to create this tension and release in each scene.  For Deirdre and Sorcha, in writing the novel, I have built up a whole bag-full of ideas to build scenes—the point to always move toward the relic flaw resolution.  In addition, the telic flaw resolution must be a great climax.  Perhaps we should look at that.  

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Tension and Release

21 February 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The point of the rising action and of the overall novel is to reveal the protagonist as well as the action of the protagonist in resolving the telic flaw.  They are basically the same thing.  This is all about secrets.

If you remember, fiction writing is all about entertainment.  That’s all there is.  We make secrets and relationships entertaining by creating tension.

Every scene has some degree of a tension buildup (rising action) and release (climax). 

The scene, like the short story, requires tension and release.  This is called the scene rising action by some to the scene climax.  I intentionally don’t use these words because I don’t want to confuse the rising action and the climax. 

Part of the problem is that many scenes don’t have a climax.  This goes back to the concept of the telic flaw, and the telic flaw resolution.  All novels (and short stories) have a telic flaw.  The telic flaw is the problem that must be resolved by the protagonist.  The telic flaw is resolved in the climax.  Unfortunately or fortunately, most scenes don’t really have a climax, and only the climax scene can resolve the telic flaw.  This produces a conundrum. 

A novel only has a single telic flaw.  This means it is technically impossible for each scene to have its own telic flaw.  Further, each scene supports and provides development in the rising action to result in the resolution of the telic flaw.  This makes it logically impossible for a scene to have a classic climax or rising action.  Again, this is why I call it tension and release. 

If you define a scene as a goal that the protagonist must clear or achieve, as opposed to a telic flaw, you can do more with the idea of a scene rising action to a scene climax, but the problem is that not every scene has a goal for the protagonist to clear or achieve.  The purpose of the scene is not necessarily the protagonist’s goals but rather the protagonist’s eventual resolution of the telic flaw.  In fact, it is highly possible for the protagonist to fail to achieve a personal or even a novel based goal in a scene.  Does this make certain scenes tragedies and others comedies?

Say it’s not so.  Here’s my point.  You can look at scenes as incorporating goals for the protagonist.  This isn’t a bad way of looking at it, but this is incomplete.  Again, this is why I call scene development the tension and release and not scene rising action and scene climax. 

In this sense, you can have a scene with tension development and some slight release.  You can also have a strong release.  In fact, you can define the climax scene in exactly the same fashion as all the other scenes.  The climax scene simply has some continuing tension development that results in the telic flaw resolution—the release of the entire novel.   

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, The Short Story

20 February 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The point of the rising action and of the overall novel is to reveal the protagonist as well as the action of the protagonist in resolving the telic flaw.  They are basically the same thing.  This is all about secrets.

If you remember, fiction writing is all about entertainment.  That’s all there is.  We make secrets and relationships entertaining by creating tension.

Every scene has some degree of a tension buildup (rising action) and release (climax). 

Here is the outline for short story development:

1. Short stories must start with a defined protagonist and antagonist.  You must also understand the telic flaw, climax, and resolution before you begin to write. 

2. Short story input is always the initial scene (there is no other input)

3. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters).  The development of a short story pretty much requires putting the protagonist and the antagonist into the initial scene.

4. Imagine creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax), and develop the rising action and climax.

5. Write the short story using the creative elements to build the rising action.

6. Write the climax and the kicker

I’m not a huge short story writer.  I have written short stories, and I have turned scenes into short stories.  That’s not to say I can’t or don’t appreciate short stories.  I just don’t usually get short story length ideas.  My writing ideas are usually noel length.  In addition, my style is all about revelation.  I want to take a wonderful protagonist and either start them at zero or bring them to zero and then build them up to hero. 

I like to spend long periods of writing time in just this endeavor.  This is what excites my creativity and my imagination.  Not every writer is like me.  I suspect many novelists are.  I also suspect that most short story writers love their media and genre.  There are a few like Ray Bradbury and George Martin who bridge the short story and novel divide, but not everyone wants to write a novel.  Plus, don’t try to immolate Martin’s later writing (Game of Thrones).  This format is basically unsalable unless you have multiple bestsellers and some great connections in the field.   If you do, you don’t need my advice—go for it.

The problem for me and short stories, is that you really need to know where you are going and what you are doing when you get there.  I really like the journey, and for me, a short story isn’t so much a journey as it is a side trail.  I really like to get into my protagonists and spend lots of time with them.  I suppose a short story author can do this to a degree, but it would require a whole lot of shorts for me.  Usually, shorts are a one off and never more—if they are more than this, they usually deserve a novel. 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Writing Stories and Scenes

19 February 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The point of the rising action and of the overall novel is to reveal the protagonist as well as the action of the protagonist in resolving the telic flaw.  They are basically the same thing.  This is all about secrets.

If you remember, fiction writing is all about entertainment.  That’s all there is.  We make secrets and relationships entertaining by creating tension.

Every scene has some degree of a tension buildup (rising action) and release (climax). 

I’m not sure I’ve ever connected the scene outline to the short story for you before.  The reason is that I really haven’t wanted to confuse you.  I’m into writing novels and not short stories.  It’s not that I don’t like short stories, but it’s not my genre.  In fact, I’ve turned many of my scenes into short stories for marketing purposes.  It really isn’t that difficult to turn cohesive scenes into short stories.  Let’s review the scene development outline.

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

Then let’s turn this into a short story development outline.  Realize that a short story might contain more than one scene, but generally this is what the short story outline should look like.

1. Short stories must start with a defined protagonist and antagonist.  You must also understand the telic flaw, climax, and resolution before you begin to write. 

2. Short story input is always the initial scene (there is no other input)

3. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters).  The development of a short story pretty much requires putting the protagonist and the antagonist into the initial scene.

4. Imagine creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax), and develop the rising action and climax.

5. Write the short story using the creative elements to build the rising action.

6. Write the climax and the kicker

Short stories are so short you don’t have time messing around with writing to the telic flaw.  You have to go for the jugular.  You can write a short story over and over in an iterative process to get to a final version, but short stories are short for a reason.  The author must get the stage set and the play complete and resolved in the minimal words required.  If you aren’t into this, go for writing a novel.

Short stories are short.  They are not drawn out in any fashion.  Novels are not supposed to include any extraneous material, but novels allow the full revelation of the protagonist as well as the telic flaw resolution.  This is not the work of a short story.  More tomorrow. 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, more Stories and Scenes

18 February 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The point of the rising action and of the overall novel is to reveal the protagonist as well as the action of the protagonist in resolving the telic flaw.  They are basically the same thing.  This is all about secrets.

If you remember, fiction writing is all about entertainment.  That’s all there is.  We make secrets and relationships entertaining by creating tension.

Every scene has some degree of a tension buildup (rising action) and release (climax). 

Short stories stand alone.  They have a telic flaw and resolve that telic flaw within the short story.  Really great short stories have a pithy climax resolution that also usually includes a kicker.  A great scene is similar.

The scene includes the telic flaw of the novel, but always must have its own tension development to a release.  You could look at each scene as having a specific purpose within the fabric of the novel.  For example, the initial scene.

The initial scene for any well written novel does this.  First, it sets the novel.  Second, it introduces the protagonist and either the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper.  Third, it introduces the telic flaw of the novel.  The telic flaw isn’t resolved in the initial scene, it is just introduced. 

The tension in the initial scene usually comes from the meeting of the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper.  This doesn’t make the initial scene easy to write, unless you already have developed the protagonist, the antagonist and the protagonist’s helper.  In that case, the scene becomes a breeze.  The point being, the tension (rising action) in the scene comes from a solid source.  The release not so much, and the point is that the author should craft each scene just like this.  Tension and release within each scene.  The question is how to develop or use tension and what should be the release?

These are very difficult and amorphous questions because the telic flaw of the novel depends on them.  Plus, they are dependent on the telic flaw, the telic flaw resolution, and the plotline.  Each of these must be taken into consideration in the crafting of each scene for tension and release.  Luckily, the scene outline can help us at each step.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Stories and Scenes

17 February 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The point of the rising action and of the overall novel is to reveal the protagonist as well as the action of the protagonist in resolving the telic flaw.  They are basically the same thing.  This is all about secrets.

If you remember, fiction writing is all about entertainment.  That’s all there is.  We make secrets and relationships entertaining by creating tension.

I don’t think the short story is a good basis for novel development. Game of Thrones is an example of a novel that will likely never be written in the future.  On the other hand, Tuff Voyaging by the same author is a wonderful novel obviously based on short stories.  Although I don’t think short stories make for the best novel development, I think we can learn something from the idea.  Short story writing can teach us a lot about scene development.

This entire blog is pretty much dedicated to scene development.  I touch on almost all novel writing ideas, but the focus is scenes.  To be clear, a short story is like an independent scene.  In fact, I have, in the past, taken scenes from my novels and turned them into complete short stories.  This is how close a scene is to a short story.  So, what is the difference?

A scene is characterized by tension and release.  A short story is similarly characterized by rising action and a climax.  We ask again: what’s the difference?  Here it is.  A short story has a telic flaw which is resolved in the climax.  A scene supports the overall telic flaw of the novel.  Only the climax scene of a novel resolves the telic flaw of the novel.  Each of the other scenes in the rising action are supporting scenes in the development of the ultimate telic flaw resolution.  This is why we say a scene is characterized by tension and release rather than having a rising action and climax.  However, every scene has some degree of a tension buildup (rising action) and release (climax).  This is so important, it’s worth exploring on its own and in relation to short stories.       

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Story Based Novels and Secrets

16 February 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The point of the rising action and of the overall novel is to reveal the protagonist as well as the action of the protagonist in resolving the telic flaw.  They are basically the same thing.  This is all about secrets.

If you remember, fiction writing is all about entertainment.  That’s all there is.  We make secrets and relationships entertaining by creating tension.

The example of manga and anime fits into the short story novelist style.  I’ve mentioned before, there are two types of novelist: short story and novel length.  Short story novelists usually come out of short story writing.  Great examples of these authors are Ray Bradbury, George R. R. Martin, and Isaac Asimov. 

Short story novelists primarily write short stories.  To make novels, they tend to take their short stories of a similar theme or subject and pull them together into novels.  Some examples of this are The Martian Chronicles, Tuff Voyaging, Game of Thrones, and I Robot

Short story novelists typically produce scenes that are story-like.  They wisely treat scenes like short stories that are entertaining in themselves and have very strong tension and release.  Anime and manga are similar.  They produce shorts that relate to the overall theme and plotline of the manga or anime.  The problem with this for the novelist is that manga, anime, and short story development can result in side stories and story arcs that are not directly related to the telic flaw of the novel.  This can cause serious problems for overall plot development of the novel. 

For manga and anime, this is a feature.  For any type of novel, this is not good and can ruin the telic flaw resolution.  I want to encourage all novelists to approach scene development in a similar manner to short stories.  Perhaps this is something we should look at.    

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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