Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, I Learned the Secret to Developing a Plot, Enchantment Novels, Khione

22 January 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

Just remember this to develop a plot:

 

  1. Protagonist and setting are used to design an exciting and entertaining
  2. Initial scene which provides a
  3. Scene output and a theme question based on the telic flaw of the protagonist
    1. The scene output leads to the next scene
    2. The theme question provides a basis for the plot
  4. The scene outline provides the continuing scenes and the theme question focuses the plot
  5. Resolving the theme question (telic flaw) resolves the plot

 

Khione: Enchantment and the Fox is the fourth Enchantment novel.  Once you get this basic method of plot development, you can pretty quickly and easily design a plot.  With Khione, I designed a character a demi-goddess who was living on cats and squirrels in down town Boston.  Khione came out of Hestia.  She was one of the demi-gods in that novel.  In Hestia, Khione was released from her slavery, but Khione has a problem the rest of the demi-gods don’t have.

 

In the initial scene, Khione is discovered by two graduate students from Boston University.  One of them is studying predators in the wild.  Khione is a real predator.  Pearce Widmund catches Khione accidentally when she is hit by a bus.  That is the initial scene and the beginning of the novel.  Pearce has no idea about Khione when he finds her.  This becomes the basis of the novel.

 

The question is then: who is Khione?  This becomes the theme and plot question.  The novel answers this question and provides an climax that resolves this telic flaw.                          

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, I Learned the Secret to Developing a Plot, Enchantment Novels, Aksinya

21 January 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

Just remember this to develop a plot:

 

  1. Protagonist and setting are used to design an exciting and entertaining
  2. Initial scene which provides a
  3. Scene output and a theme question based on the telic flaw of the protagonist
    1. The scene output leads to the next scene
    2. The theme question provides a basis for the plot
  4. The scene outline provides the continuing scenes and the theme question focuses the plot
  5. Resolving the theme question (telic flaw) resolves the plot

 

Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon is the third Enchantment novel.  This novel began with the idea of a girl calling a demon.  The girl was Aksinya and fully developed as a character when I began to write.  The setting was Russia during the Bolshevik revolution.  The reason Aksinya called a demon was to protect her aristocratic family from the Bolsheviks.

 

This idea is gripping and provided a wonderful initial scene.  You might be able to imagine the strength of such a scene.  As an author, I can describe and develop huge ideas in such a scene.  From the concept of sorcery and an idea on how it works to the figure of the girl who dares call a demon to the demon Asmodeus himself.

 

And there is Aksinya’s problem.  Asmodeus is the demon of luxuria (lust), and Aksinya’s problem is luxuria.  I state luxuria specifically because the word lust connotes sexual desire, and lururia connotes a desire for all things.  Aksinya’s problem is a desire for luxuria and not just sex, however, she has an issue with lust too.

 

So, the theme question and the plot question that comes out of this initial scene are a little different than that of the other novels.  From them, the question usually is “who.”  In this case, the question is “what.” What will happen to the girl who called a demon?  I do like “who” plot and theme questions.  Readers like discovery novels.  On the other hand, “what” novels can be very powerful.  Ultimately, the question is what will Aksinya do about her own personal demon.  This, by the way, is the telic flaw and the problem that must be resolved in the novel.  In Faust, the demon eventually took the soul of the protagonist.  Aksinya is a semi-allegory based on Tobit.  If you want to know what happens to Aksinya, Tobit will show you—to a degree.  Better to read the novel, and you can, with commentary on this blog and my other blog.  I actually blogged the entire novel for you in pieces.                        

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, I Learned the Secret to Developing a Plot, Enchantment Novels, Dana-ana

20 January 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

Just remember this to develop a plot:

 

  1. Protagonist and setting are used to design an exciting and entertaining
  2. Initial scene which provides a
  3. Scene output and a theme question based on the telic flaw of the protagonist
    1. The scene output leads to the next scene
    2. The theme question provides a basis for the plot
  4. The scene outline provides the continuing scenes and the theme question focuses the plot
  5. Resolving the theme question (telic flaw) resolves the plot

 

Dana-ana: Enchantment and the Maiden is the second Enchantment novel.  By this novel, I really had this concept down.  I designed Dana-ana as a lost Anglo-Saxon girl in the modern era.  When I write Anglo-Saxon, I mean ancient Anglo-Saxon.  I researched Anglo-Saxon culture and studied the language.  I used the culture as the basis for my first science fiction series, The Chronicles of the Dragon and the Fox.  I wanted to do more.  Anglo-Saxon is a really interesting culture, and it comes right out of England.  I also wanted Dana-ana to have Anglo-Saxon associations for other reasons, but the point is that I had a fully developed character as the focus of the novel.

 

Second point, the setting of the novel.  I knew the location, and designed the place.  I really didn’t have to design much, the place is real.  I don’t tell you where it is exactly, which is not my usual writing style.

 

The initial scene is the loner and outcast, Dana-ana begin bullied by students in her school with the permission of the teachers.  If this doesn’t bring up questions in your mind, nothing will.  Dana-ana is rescued by Byron, a classmate.

 

The obvious question is who is this Dana-ana?  Byron provides the connection to reality.  Dana-ana won’t talk, at first.  She doesn’t have anything.  She lives by herself on the Bayou.  She literally has nothing and eats out of other people’s garbage.  What might make a person live like this and be like this?  Is Dana-ana insane?  Is she abused?  Is something wrong with her?  Byron and Byron’s family wrestle with these questions while they get to know Dana-ana.  The novel flows from these questions and ideas.                      

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, I Learned the Secret to Developing a Plot, Enchantment Novels, Hestia

19 January 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

Just remember this to develop a plot:

 

  1. Protagonist and setting are used to design an exciting and entertaining
  2. Initial scene which provides a
  3. Scene output and a theme question based on the telic flaw of the protagonist
    1. The scene output leads to the next scene
    2. The theme question provides a basis for the plot
  4. The scene outline provides the continuing scenes and the theme question focuses the plot
  5. Resolving the theme question (telic flaw) resolves the plot

 

Hestia: Enchantment of the Hearth is the first Enchantment novel.  The protagonist does not appear in the initial scene.  She does appear in the scene after it.  The setting is Lycantos in Greece at an archeological dig.  I’ve been to Greece and the area many times.  I wasn’t there on an archeological big, but I read a lot about them.

 

The protagonist is a university professor.  She is an expert who is a great teacher.  There is more, but just realize, the protagonist is well developed.  She is a seeker.

 

In the initial scene, one of the graduate students accidentally evokes the no kidding, real and actual goddess Hestia.  I took the evocation from a Greek mysterium evocation of Mithras and reworked it for Hestia.  Everything is based on real history and historical documents.

 

You can imagine the problems of a real goddess evoked into modern Greece.  The simplest question from the initial scene is this: is this person really Hestia?  If she is, the obvious question is: what does this mean?  These are complex theme questions that must be answered in the plot.  This is the telic flaw.  The protagonist is a seeker and wants an answer to this most important question: what does the evocation of Hestia mean for her and the world.  It’s a novel, but don’t you want to know too?                     

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, I Learned the Secret to Developing a Plot, Enchantment Novels

18 January 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

Just remember this to develop a plot:

 

  1. Protagonist and setting are used to design an exciting and entertaining
  2. Initial scene which provides a
  3. Scene output and a theme question based on the telic flaw of the protagonist
    1. The scene output leads to the next scene
    2. The theme question provides a basis for the plot
  4. The scene outline provides the continuing scenes and the theme question focuses the plot
  5. Resolving the theme question (telic flaw) resolves the plot

 

My Ancient Light novels came out of the above outline, especially the third and following.  As I noted to you before, the first novel Aegypt, started with a theme question.  Here is the question: what would happen if modern people came face to face with a real goddess?  This question tied with the setting and protagonist resulted in the plot of the novel you can buy and read.  You can also see the first chapter on my website, Amazon, or a host of other sellers.

 

To use this question effectively, I had to know the entire plot before I began to write.  This became a problem for the second novel, Sister of Light.  The question was different, and I began the novel where Aegypt ended.  I had an initial focus, but the initial scene isn’t strong enough.  My publisher still liked the novel and put it on contract.  Sister of Light isn’t a bad novel.  It is a fun traipse through pre-WWII Europe, America, and Africa.  Leora Bolang has to contend with the modern world.  But I found my pace as a writer with Sister of Darkness.  In Sister of Darkness, the initial scene launches the novel in an exciting burst that coherently drives the rest of the novel.  You could say, I finally learned how to use the above outline to develop a novel.

 

That isn’t to say I cohesively understood the outline.  That would have to wait until a few more novels.  I had it in my mind and could use it to build a novel.  This is especially true in my Enchantment novels.  Where the Ancient Light novels were mainly driven by history and historical events, the Enchantment novels, although historical, are driven by the characters and their lives.                   

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, I Learned the Secret to Developing a Plot, Ancient Light Novels

17 January 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

In writing the Ancient Light novels, I discovered the secret of developing a plot.  At the beginning, I thought a plot came fully armed from the mind of the writer.  This didn’t work well, so I built up the idea of a core question to focus the plot development.  This worked adequately, but it meant you had to know the plot before you began—based on the question.

 

I moved from the idea of writing a plot from a plot or theme question to writing a plot based on the protagonist, setting, and the initial scene.  This made me focus my strongest efforts on the initial scene and protagonist.  Since the initial scene sells a novel, this idea makes the most sense, and I discovered I could write novels, not quite effortlessly, but easily and coherently.

 

From writing a theme question, I went to writing a theme statement.  With a theme statement, I have a beginning point from which to develop an initial scene, protagonist, antagonist, protagonist’s helper, and setting.  The theme statement allows you to focus on building the initial scene.

 

A good initial scene (exciting and entertaining) will give you a theme question.  This question can be the jumping off point for the plot.  So, back around full circle.

 

Just remember this to develop a plot:

 

  1. Protagonist and setting are used to design an exciting and entertaining
  2. Initial scene which provides a
  3. Scene output and a theme question based on the telic flaw of the protagonist
    1. The scene output leads to the next scene
    2. The theme question provides a basis for the plot
  4. The scene outline provides the continuing scenes and the theme question focuses the plot
  5. Resolving the theme question (telic flaw) resolves the plot

 

I want to show you how I used these ideas in my Enchantment novels to develop them.                

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, I Learned the Secret to Developing a Plot, Warrior of Darkness

16 January 2018, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action
  3. The Climax
  4. The falling action
  5. The dénouement

Announcement:   Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  back in the USA.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

Warrior of Darkness followed as the next Ancient Light novel.  In the initial scene Klava prevents a PIRA (Provisional Irish Republican Army) bomb from going off.  The bombers are watching from the top of a hill.  The means that Klava uses to stop a bomb is to turn the bomb back on the makers and the setters.  The makers are two members of the PIRA.  A leader, Red Donald, is also there, and a magic user who was supposed to have hidden the bomb.

 

Klava stops the bomb and turns it back against the makers.  The leader is injured but makes it out alive.  The magic user is knocked out and lies hidden on the hill.  This initial scene is the key to the plot of the entire novel.  Red Donald seeks out Klava to enact revenge.  The Magic user, Niul, wants to find Klava for another reason.  His magic is ruined and he has seen a miracle.  Magic and miracles can’t coexist.  Niul needs to know everything about Klava.

 

They tie of the initial scene drives one to revenge and the other to the need to know.  The plot descends directly from these needs.                

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

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