Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, more Liking Sorcha

18 June 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  How about liking Sorcha (and Deirdre)?

I’ve mentioned before, the most important characteristic for a protagonist is that the reader basically agrees with their decisions.  This is a huge point.  For example, we can see this with the basic idea of reading.  Readers will not like protagonists who don’t read.  The basis for this is the concept of agreement with the protagonist.  For example, if the protagonist hates reading and doesn’t want to read, the reader will find that protagonist unlikable.  How far do you think an unlikable protagonist will go?

What about morality?  If the reader finds the protagonist’s actions and ideas to be immoral, the reader will disagree with the protagonist and therefore find them unlikeable.  You can evaluate any other characteristic this way.  This is our means test for the protagonist.

Whatever the protagonist plans or chooses to do, the author must evaluate whether the reader will agree with them.  Now, you can always have the protagonist’s actions go awry, but the plan should be approved by the reader.  For example, most readers would find it unacceptable for a protagonist to steal from innocent people to make money for their cause or for themselves.  Although this is a normal event in Dungeon games and such, it is not moral or ethical.  The very idea of stealing from others must be tempered with the balance of need and the status of the victim.  I’m not into the idea of Robin hood.  Stealing is stealing in my book.  If you realize, Robinhood was involved in a war between Saxons and Normans, you get an entirely different perspective.  The point is that you must convince the reader of the morality of your protagonist and their actions.  The writer who is unaware of this, treads a dangerous landscape.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Liking Sorcha

17 June 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  How about liking Sorcha (and Deirdre).

If you notice, all the things (model of study, reading, and morality) already lead me to like Sorcha.  This is why I developed her as I did.  I do want to reiterate, I didn’t develop a prude.  When I write morality, I don’t mean someone who always follows all the rules, but rather one who isn’t a criminal.  That’s the point of morality.  When I write a reader, I don’t mean a person who has every book available or who has read ever book, rather someone who loves to read.  When I write about study, I mean the kind of person who believes that study can teach and instruct in ways readers understand—even if it isn’t completely accurate.

So, as a reader, if you met a person who is a reader, who thinks, like you do, that study can make the world better and more understandable, and who is not a criminal, you would most likely like them.  You would give them the benefit of the doubt.  This is what I want for my protagonists.

If you are writing for a different audience, you might do something else, but let me remind you.  We are writing about readers.  People who aren’t readers are not your audience.  In fact, people who aren’t readers don’t read books or buy books.  Non-readers are the opposite of your audience. 

So, if your protagonists are criminals, don’t like to read, and don’t think they get anything out of reading, you pretty much just wrote a novel no one will buy.  These are implied characteristics.  There are a few more characteristics we can apply to the protagonist that makes them more appealing to our readers (audience).  Let’s look at them.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Sorcha and Pieces of the Romantic Comedy

16 June 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  Now to a Romantic plot with a comedy.

So, how are we going to build this Romantic comedy with Sorcha as the protagonist?  Since the telic flaw is to be finished, the first step is to make it appear that Sorcha and Deirdre, the protagonist’s helper, will not be able to accomplish this goal.

The point of the Romantic plot is to create a circumstance that makes the resolution of the telic flaw impossible.  As I noted yesterday, the telic flaw is the finishing of Sorcha and Deirdre.  We need to provide a driving circumstance where they can’t be finished.  This also produces pathos development for these characters.   

What we need to do to achieve this is to build scenes and circumstances to force the plot and the characters into a corner.  At the same time, we need to make it possible for them to logically escape the impossibility of the plot not being resolved.  The way I intend and have been doing this, is by creating circumstances that will build to an adventurous and exciting climax. 

You might ask, isn’t this the same as the plot to the telic flaw resolution?  The answer is yes, it is, but there is also in this novel the internal telic flaw and the external telic flaw.  The plot is not necessarily separate from these, but it is a parallel to them.

The novel wouldn’t be very exciting if it was just about education and finishing.  Instead, I’ve pulled in all kinds of excitement mostly based on the training and setting as well as the protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Thus, although the novel is about the telic flaw of finishing, there is a whole background behind this that allows me to design the plot of the novel. 

What I’ve done most specifically is to produce a discovery plot where the protagonists are discovering about the school and the character Cassandra.  This provides all kinds of scenes about just who Cassandra is and the other beings around her.  This is extensive and powerful in the context of the novel.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Sorcha and Building the Romantic Comedy

15 June 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  Now to a Romantic plot with a comedy.

So, how are we going to build this Romantic comedy with Sorcha as the protagonist?  Since the telic flaw is to be finished, the first step is to make it appear that Sorcha and Deirdre, the protagonist’s helper, will not be able to accomplish this goal.

The best way to do this might be to have them risk graduation or continuation in the boarding school they were assigned to. In addition, or rather as part of this, the circumstances that might affect their graduation or continuation must be dire.

We are always looking for circumstances, basically scene development where the protagonist and the protagonist’s helper are at risk of the loss of their lives or worse.  The “or worse” applies in the supernatural or reflected worldview situations we might invoke. 

The entire point is to place Sorcha and Deirdre in jeopardy of their lives for accomplishing an important goal which might get them kicked out of school—or worse.

In the previous novel, they were both expelled and had their reputations and lives tarnished through their actions.  In this novel, I expect to have them get by the skin of their teeth.  In fact, the school may not know anything about their actions, at least not officially because of the circumstances of the situation and the individuals and beings involved. 

There is much more to this.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Sorcha and a more Romantic Comedy

14 June 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  Now to a Romantic plot with a comedy.

As I mentioned yesterday, the banality of many plot resolutions in both novels and in movies shows either a total lack of intelligence in the authors or in the readers/viewers.  I’m not sure why we are suddenly getting some many poorly crafted stories.

Certainly, let’s ensure our novels and writing can’t fit into this category.  As I’ve noted before, the author of a novel has the power over time.  The author also needs to set up his resolution to appear impossible.  The resolution must or should use logic, reasoning, and other means of solving the problem.  This is very critical.  When we craft our telic flaw, we make it seem impossible to resolve.  When we craft our resolution, we make it seem logically inevitable.  You don’t have to write logic, but that’s exactly what it is.  The resolution must be eyewatering to the reader/viewer.

What do I mean by that?  It means that the resolution is unexpected.  It must be logical.  How do we make it logical?  The author has all the time in the world to devise the resolution and the author can craft all the needed ingredients to craft the resolution. 

For example, if the impossible resolution requires the protagonist to sing Danny Boy, you can put into the novel at some point the protagonist learning Danny Boy.  If the antagonist requires some kind of Achilles heel, the author can add this at any time in the development of the antagonist in the rising action.  This is easy. With the control of time and space, the author can make anything happen as he or she desires.  This is the power of developing the Romantic plot. 

How this pays out with Sorcha is the next question.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Sorcha and a Romantic Comedy

13 June 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  Now to a Romantic plot with a comedy.

We need a Romantic plot set in a comedy.  Now a comedy is a novel or a story where the protagonist overcomes the telic flaw.  Most simply, a comedy isn’t funny or filled with fun, it is just a novel where the protagonist succeeds in overcoming the problem of the novel.  The protagonist usually survives and the end is positive.  This isn’t always true, but in almost every entertaining novel it is true. 

Most readers seek a positive end or resolution to the problem of the novel.  Usually, ambivalent or poor endings, that is for the story or the protagonist are negatives to the reader.  The question for the author is just how to resolve the problem or telic flaw of the novel.

Usually, readers are looking for a Romantic plot.  In a Romantic plot, the resolution seems impossible until it is inevitable.  There is a bit more to this.  Obviously, by this definition, the resolution must appear impossible.  We can gather some important data from this.  If you have an impossible looking resolution, the resolution or solution can’t be trivial.  It must be based on reason and powerful reason.  It must be something the average person can’t discover easily, but when it is resolved or revealed, the reader finds it to be obvious.

I mention the above because I’ve seen many many modern movies and some novels whose ending was both trivial and obvious.  This may be the worst way to resolve any story.  Readers are looking forward to an intellectual and reasoned end.  They want the author to surprise them with something they haven’t thought of themselves.  Many movies today just use pure brute force as the resolution—what kind of novel is that.  There is more to this. 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, more Sorcha and Suspension of Disbelief

12 June 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  Now to the suspension of disbelief.

This concept is not unique in any way to a character or to a novel or writer.  This is a quality that every piece of fiction should have.  The question is then, how to use the qualities of Sorcha as a protagonist to improve the suspension of disbelief in the reader.

Let’s just touch this a little.  The main point is to have a believable protagonist.  I could write believable characters in general.  I’ve read a very few novels, mostly those unpublished or some self-published, where the characters are incredibly unbelievable.  It isn’t so much that the characters aren’t well developed—the characters are unbelievable.  Most of the time, these unbelievable characters are surrounded with all kinds of telling us about them.  Even the greatest characters who are wrapped in telling are terribly boring, or at least, the writing is terribly boring. 

I just finished, this year, a review of a novel that was horrific in the amount of telling in it.  The author self-published this fantasy novel.  He really needed an editor for many reasons.  The worst part of the novel was that the author told everything.  There was about 75% telling and the rest mostly action narrative.  In modern novels, we would like about 5% telling and the rest dialog and action narrate.  The dialog should be about 75% of the novel with the rest action narrative.  This can slid based on the type of writing, but a novel that is mostly telling is perhaps the most boring novel ever written.  This was.  That’s why I used it as a negative example without mentioning the name of the novel or the author.  I did give a complete review back to this author and recommended they not self-publish the next novel in the series without making significant corrections. 

So, for suspension of disbelief, the most important quality in any novel is to show and not tell.  Second, dialog should be three to one for action and anything else.  If you don’t have significant amounts of dialog, you have a real problem with your writing, and you run the risk of ruining or not achieving the suspension of disbelief. 

I guess there is ore that we can say about this.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Sorcha and Suspension of Disbelief

11 June 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  Now to the suspension of disbelief.

This concept is not unique in any way to a character or to a novel or writer.  This is a quality that every piece of fiction should have.  The question is then, how to use the qualities of Sorcha as a protagonist to improve the suspension of disbelief in the reader.

Now, this is a difficult idea to define and describe.  I could go back to the basics of the suspension of disbelief and lay those out to you, but I think there is still some scope in the protagonist and the depiction of the protagonist to help define this suspension of disbelief.

First, we want the reader to accept out character and be immersed in the life of the character.  This is the entire development of a protagonist our readers should like or love.   With a protagonist who loves to read and study, who uses study to improve and resolve problems, and who is moral within the construction of the worldview of the novel, we have a protagonist who will potentially hold the suspension of disbelief. 

As long as the protagonist can hold this suspension, the problem becomes the writing and the execution of the writing.  Perhaps we need to look at this in the context of the protagonist and the suspension of disbelief.   

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Sorcha and Pathos Specifics

10 June 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  Now to pathos.

How do we place Sorcha into situations that provide pity and fear for the readers?  The words pity and fear from Aristotle provides the answer.  Our writing must place Sorcha in settings and situations that cause the reader to pity her and have fear for her.  Some of the best ways to achieve this I’ll list below:

Now, I’ll provide some specifics from what I’ve written in the novel so far to show how we develop pathos.

  1. Fear: dangerous situations where she or Dierdre are at risk and where they must put themselves at risk for each other or others.
    1. Sorcha and Deirdre realize they have been sent to their current boarding school in France to be finished, but also to investigate something.  The dangerous situations revolve around this investigating and odd circumstances.  That is general, I’ll provide some specifics under additional letter headings.
    1. The initial investigations lead them to discover a Druid witch-hunter, a forlorn vampire, and finally Cassandra.  Cassandra is a girl who seems to be very old and has been kept prisoner in the convent attached to the school.
    1. The dangerous situations then are encounters they have with these major characters and especially the interactions of these characters.
    1. I add in a Fae creature who becomes attached to Deirdre through a very dangerous situation.
    1. The climax of the novel will be the confrontation of the girls and their helpers with a demon.  This is the ultimate danger in the novel.
  2. Pity: circumstances where Sorcha is placed in a situation outside of her control but that affects her work or standing.  Examples might be: other girls who try to submarine her work, relationships, or experiences.
    1. Being placed in the boarding school for finishing is just one of these.
    1. The girls are invited to vacation with their new friends.  Not so much pity, but a pity developing circumstance none-the-less.
    1. During the vacation, they meet their friends brothers who a typical brothers and all in military school.
  3. Pity: work to keep Deirdre under control.
    1. Not just Deirdre, but the other characters also provide this problem and Sorcha is required to bring out her leadership qualities.  These are what she needs finishing with.
  4. Fear: circumstances of potential failure especially in relation to the telic flaw or accomplishments.
    1. This really points back to the first list.
  5. Fear: circumstances of potential harm to Sorcha or Dierdre.
    1. This also points back to the first list above.

The specifics aren’t really that specific.  The point is the revelation of the lives and experiences of Sorcha (and Dierdre). The pity and fear comes out of the excitement and problems developed in the revelation of the protagonist and characters.  That’s pretty easy to grasp.

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, How do the Characters Match Up, Sorcha and more Pathos

9 June 2021, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita. 

Here are my rules of writing:

1. Entertain your readers.

2. Don’t confuse your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing. 

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5. Write the release

6. Write the kicker

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with. 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

Here is the theme statement:

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement. 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene. 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too. 

Today:

The most important point about the telic flaw and the protagonist is that we need to develop a great protagonist.  That protagonist must bring us a telic flaw.  That’s the main point about the telic flaw and the protagonist.

The problem of the protagonist is the telic flaw of the novel.  If you approach the development of the protagonist with this in mind, you can build a wonderful protagonist and telic flaw. 

What qualities make a protagonist more likely to be marketable and publishable.  That’s what I want to know.

What do all readers have in common.  These are characteristics that must endear readers to a protagonist.  Here is what we have determined:

  1. A reader.
  2. Competent because they read.
  3. Reading and writing is important.  Study through reading is important.
  4. Skills come through reading and study.
  5. Moral within the context of the event horizon and the culture. 
  6. Caution using ideas and words that alienate your readers.
  7. Pathos: emotions felt by the reader.
  8. Suspension of disbelief.
  9. A great Romantic plot with a comedy
  10. A protagonist that the reader eventually likes.
  11. Protagonists who are endearing because of who they are or their needs or both.
  12. Protagonists with a unique or endearing skill.
  13. Protagonists who achieve
  14. Heroes

How about we take a look at my current protagonist and protagonist’s helper.  Let’s see if they meet the criteria for a protagonist the reader would like and how well.

Sorcha is the protagonist.  We saw that Sorcha was willing to go to prison, face bullying, and literally hide in a school to read and study.  This is exactly the kind of protagonist readers love.  At least, this is the archetype for the first characteristic I noted in the list. 

We saw how Sorcha fits the model of study, reading, and morality.  Now to pathos.

How do we place Sorcha into situations that provide pity and fear for the readers?  The words pity and fear from Aristotle provides the answer.  Our writing must place Sorcha in settings and situations that cause the reader to pity her and have fear for her.  Some of the best ways to achieve this I’ll list below:

  1. Fear: dangerous situations where she or Dierdre are at risk and where they must put themselves at risk for each other or others.
  2. Pity: circumstances where Sorcha is placed in a situation outside of her control but that affects her work or standing.  Examples might be: other girls who try to submarine her work, relationships, or experiences.
  3. Pity: work to keep Deirdre under control.
  4. Fear: circumstances of potential failure especially in relation to the telic flaw or accomplishments.
  5. Fear: circumstances of potential harm to Sorcha or Dierdre.

These are by no means all the potential means of developing pity and fear in a novel or for a character.   These are just some very general ways to develop pity and fear.  I should turn them into specifics from the novel, so far.   

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment