Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Protagonist and more Leadership

17 February 2019, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

The most important scene is the initial scene, but the protagonist is always the focus of this scene and the novel.  Let’s start with the protagonist.  What makes a great protagonist?  Here is a list.

 

  1. Normal person (not wealthy, noble, or privileged)
  2. Loves to read
  3. Loves to learn
  4. Unique skill(s), power(s) and/or learning
  5. Pathos (poor, homeless, abused, friendless, ill)
  6. Individualistic and independent
  7. Introspective
  8. Leader
  9. Naturally good
  10. Rejection of the urban
  11. Rejection of the modern
  12. Appeal to the imagination

 

The romantic protagonist is a leader.  Today’s protagonist leaders are pretty weak and wimpy ones.  That isn’t true in the real world and everyone knows it.  Just think what kinds of characters do you like to follow?

 

There are various types of leaders.  Do you remember the kids who either self-chose or were chosen to lead in grade school?  They were either jocks, toughs, or the bigger kids.  Not to disparage any of those, but they weren’t usually the readers, intellectuals, or the kids who were good at math.  In some rare occasions they were, but not in my experience.  The kids who were smart ended up being the readers, intellectuals, and the ones who were good at math—they wanted leaders picked for their knowledge and empathy.  When we got to college and the real world, we realized that leaders are really chosen because of their knowledge and usually for their leadership skills.  Those leadership skills are usually empathy as well as determination.

 

Notice what I wrote, and look back at the list above.  A romantic protagonist has unique skill(s), power(s), and/or learning.  In the world or novels and especially the romantic era, a leader is a leader because of skills, powers, and learning and those skills, powers, and learning usually includes intellectual.

 

This is the profile of the romantic protagonist leader, and most all romantic protagonists are the positive knowledgeable and empathetic leaders readers long for.  Let’s see some examples.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Protagonist and Leadership

16 February 2019, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

The most important scene is the initial scene, but the protagonist is always the focus of this scene and the novel.  Let’s start with the protagonist.  What makes a great protagonist?  Here is a list.

 

  1. Normal person (not wealthy, noble, or privileged)
  2. Loves to read
  3. Loves to learn
  4. Unique skill(s), power(s) and/or learning
  5. Pathos (poor, homeless, abused, friendless, ill)
  6. Individualistic and independent
  7. Introspective
  8. Leader
  9. Naturally good
  10. Rejection of the urban
  11. Rejection of the modern
  12. Appeal to the imagination

 

The romantic protagonist is a leader.  Today’s protagonist leaders are pretty weak and wimpy ones.  That isn’t true in the real world and everyone knows it.  Just think what kinds of characters do you like to follow.

 

I do write about ambivalent characters, but usually not my protagonists.  I don’t mind a protagonist to be confused or unwilling to make choices immediately, but when called to lead, I expect my protagonists to lead.  You do realize you can be confused and not entirely willing while still leading and acting like you know what you are doing.

 

In the military, we want leaders to make decisions and stick to them.  Ambivalence in leadership without direct and compelling reasons for change are considered poor leadership, both dangerous to achieving the mission and to the morale of the followers.  Books are similar.

 

Think about what you expect from a leader.  You don’t expect perfection, but you expect results and determination.  The introspection of the romantic protagonist allows the protagonist to question himself and his leadership.  The use of a protagonist’s helper gives the protagonist a means to question himself and his goals or decisions.  In no way should everyone be privy to these qualms—who would follow a leader who won’t act like a leader?

 

The romantic protagonist needs to be a leader.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Protagonist and more Showing Introspection

15 February 2019, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

The most important scene is the initial scene, but the protagonist is always the focus of this scene and the novel.  Let’s start with the protagonist.  What makes a great protagonist?  Here is a list.

 

  1. Normal person (not wealthy, noble, or privileged)
  2. Loves to read
  3. Loves to learn
  4. Unique skill(s), power(s) and/or learning
  5. Pathos (poor, homeless, abused, friendless, ill)
  6. Individualistic and independent
  7. Introspective
  8. Leader
  9. Naturally good
  10. Rejection of the urban
  11. Rejection of the modern
  12. Appeal to the imagination

 

The romantic protagonist is introspective.  How do we portray an introspective protagonist without telling?

 

Usually, we use the protagonist’s helper or another intimate to act as a sounding board for the protagonist to express his or her mind.  An author can also use a positive antagonist for the same purpose.

 

Whoa, a positive antagonist.  How can that be?  The perfect and most popular example, is A Christmas Carol.  In this novel, Scrooge is a protagonist in need of a positive change.  Usually, the antagonist opposes the protagonist and the telic flaw is to overcome the antagonist.  In A Christmas Carol, although it is a comedy, the protagonist is overcome in a positive way by the antagonist.  The antagonist is represented by the spirits and that antagonist is assumed to be God and the Christian purpose for Christmas itself.

 

In the case of Scrooge, he is need of a change that requires him to change.  The telic flaw of the novel is the overall physical problems Scrooge has caused in the world.  He can’t change the past, but he can change the future.  He is the protagonist, but the antagonist is a positive antagonist.  We usually think of the antagonist as a bad or evil being who is thwarting the protagonist.  In the case of Scrooge, the antagonist is helping Scrooge change and resolve his telic flaw.  In the case of A Christmas Carol,  the antagonist is not thwarting the protagonist, but rather aiding the protagonist in resolving the telic flaw.  This is a really different twist on the novel.

 

I’d like to see move positive antagonists.  I think I came close to this in Khione, Enchantment and the Fox.  In this novel, Khione is both helped and thwarted by Pierce.  Pierce wants to help Khione, but she has to be convinced that she needs help.  Pierce could be the protagonist’s helper or antagonist depending on how you look at the novel.  In any case, a positive antagonist is possible and can provide the introspective dialog required to reveal a romantic protagonist.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Protagonist and more Showing Introspection

 

15 February 2019, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

The most important scene is the initial scene, but the protagonist is always the focus of this scene and the novel.  Let’s start with the protagonist.  What makes a great protagonist?  Here is a list.

 

  1. Normal person (not wealthy, noble, or privileged)
  2. Loves to read
  3. Loves to learn
  4. Unique skill(s), power(s) and/or learning
  5. Pathos (poor, homeless, abused, friendless, ill)
  6. Individualistic and independent
  7. Introspective
  8. Leader
  9. Naturally good
  10. Rejection of the urban
  11. Rejection of the modern
  12. Appeal to the imagination

 

The romantic protagonist is introspective.  How do we portray an introspective protagonist without telling?

 

Usually, we use the protagonist’s helper or another intimate to act as a sounding board for the protagonist to express his or her mind.  An author can also use a positive antagonist for the same purpose.

 

Whoa, a positive antagonist.  How can that be?  The perfect and most popular example, is A Christmas Carol.  In this novel, Scrooge is a protagonist in need of a positive change.  Usually, the antagonist opposes the protagonist and the telic flaw is to overcome the antagonist.  In A Christmas Carol, although it is a comedy, the protagonist is overcome in a positive way by the antagonist.  The antagonist is represented by the spirits and that antagonist is assumed to be God and the Christian purpose for Christmas itself.

 

In the case of Scrooge, he is need of a change that requires him to change.  The telic flaw of the novel is the overall physical problems Scrooge has caused in the world.  He can’t change the past, but he can change the future.  He is the protagonist, but the antagonist is a positive antagonist.  We usually think of the antagonist as a bad or evil being who is thwarting the protagonist.  In the case of Scrooge, the antagonist is helping Scrooge change and resolve his telic flaw.  In the case of A Christmas Carol,  the antagonist is not thwarting the protagonist, but rather aiding the protagonist in resolving the telic flaw.  This is a really different twist on the novel.

 

I’d like to see move positive antagonists.  I think I came close to this in Khione, Enchantment and the Fox.  In this novel, Khione is both helped and thwarted by Pierce.  Pierce wants to help Khione, but she has to be convinced that she needs help.  Pierce could be the protagonist’s helper or antagonist depending on how you look at the novel.  In any case, a positive antagonist is possible and can provide the introspective dialog required to reveal a romantic protagonist.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Protagonist and Showing Introspection

14 February 2019, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

The most important scene is the initial scene, but the protagonist is always the focus of this scene and the novel.  Let’s start with the protagonist.  What makes a great protagonist?  Here is a list.

 

  1. Normal person (not wealthy, noble, or privileged)
  2. Loves to read
  3. Loves to learn
  4. Unique skill(s), power(s) and/or learning
  5. Pathos (poor, homeless, abused, friendless, ill)
  6. Individualistic and independent
  7. Introspective
  8. Leader
  9. Naturally good
  10. Rejection of the urban
  11. Rejection of the modern
  12. Appeal to the imagination

 

The romantic protagonist is introspective.  How do we portray an introspective protagonist without telling?

 

Indeed, one of the main characteristics of modern Romantic literature is that narrative has reduced significantly replaced by dialog.  Dialog is considered the main feature of most modern fiction.  We see dialog encased in and immersed in action.  A fight scene might be filled with dialog and good dialog will definitely be filled with action tags (or so I advise).

 

The point is to get the introspective nature of the protagonist and to show the mind of the protagonist without narration or omniscient voice.  The means is through actions—show the mind of the protagonist through his or her actions, and through dialog, place the protagonist in a situation where he or she can share his or her thoughts.

 

Dialog provides this capability, but dialog of this type usually requires a new type of character.  This new character is the protagonist’s helper.  People don’t and shouldn’t open their thoughts to just anyone.  In spite of the cliché of the bartender, I suspect even drunks don’t really show their true thoughts to just anyone.  The bartender has to be a trusted figure.  The trusted figure in a piece of fiction is the protagonist’s helper.

 

The protagonist’s helper is not just an invention of the Modern Era or Romantic Era—Don Quixote’s Sancho Panza was a very early type of protagonist’s helper we call a sidekick.  Since Don Quixote was a Nobility Era type protagonist, he had no reason to really share his thoughts with his servant, and that caused many of his problems.  On the other hand, the introspective Romantic protagonist has every reason to share his or her thoughts with the reader and with the protagonist’s helper.  Whatever you do, you need to keep in mind the readers’ desires and the characteristic of introspection in strong modern protagonists.  Just remember, show and don’t tell.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Protagonist and Introspective

13 February 2019, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

The most important scene is the initial scene, but the protagonist is always the focus of this scene and the novel.  Let’s start with the protagonist.  What makes a great protagonist?  Here is a list.

 

  1. Normal person (not wealthy, noble, or privileged)
  2. Loves to read
  3. Loves to learn
  4. Unique skill(s), power(s) and/or learning
  5. Pathos (poor, homeless, abused, friendless, ill)
  6. Individualistic and independent
  7. Introspective
  8. Leader
  9. Naturally good
  10. Rejection of the urban
  11. Rejection of the modern
  12. Appeal to the imagination

 

The romantic protagonist is introspective.  Hamlet is not a romantic character, but Hamlet is introspective, “To be or not to be…”  That’s Hamlet’s question.  Our protagonists need to be equally introspective.  I want to remind you, introspective does not mean filled with doubt or melancholy.  Although the Dane was melancholy and that is a potential characteristic for a romantic character, introspection doesn’t have to lead to depression or be depressing.

 

I read many modern character who are ambivalent, melancholy, or depressed.  Harry Potty goes through such a stage—or sits there.  You can have joyful, excited, upbeat, definitive, and decisive characters who are still thinking and thoughtful.  Introspection means thinking and thoughtful.  I love thinking and thoughtful characters and so do your readers.  The why of actions and activities is just as important in romantic writing as the actions and activities themselves.  I’ve heard it described as process compared to description.  Why does something work as opposed to just the description of the thing.

 

The most important thing to think about is how to portray your introspective protagonist without telling.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Protagonist and Independent

12 February 2019, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

The most important scene is the initial scene, but the protagonist is always the focus of this scene and the novel.  Let’s start with the protagonist.  What makes a great protagonist?  Here is a list.

 

  1. Normal person (not wealthy, noble, or privileged)
  2. Loves to read
  3. Loves to learn
  4. Unique skill(s), power(s) and/or learning
  5. Pathos (poor, homeless, abused, friendless, ill)
  6. Individualistic and independent
  7. Introspective
  8. Leader
  9. Naturally good
  10. Rejection of the urban
  11. Rejection of the modern
  12. Appeal to the imagination

 

In the Modern Era and specifically in the Romantic Era, the protagonist is driven by individualism.  What does this mean?

 

Individualistic and independent aren’t the same thing, but unique skills, powers, and/or learning allows the protagonist to be individualistic…and independent.

 

In most of my novels, the super independent protagonist learns to become somewhat dependent.  This is a redeeming theme and a classical theme.  For example, Tarzan learns to become dependent on others and learn new skills as a part of the plot of the first and other Tarzan novels.  The idea of the romantic protagonist using his or her skills to lead and help is a consistent romantic theme.  The contrast or change of the romantic protagonist to a better social being without becoming dependent, or of opening his or her independent world to another person, usually the protagonist’s helper, are consistent romantic ideas.  Anne of Green Gables is right along this idea.  Many who read the novel imagine that in the plot, Anne, the romantic protagonist is accepted by her new community, but actually, Anne accepts her community and society.  The society responds by letting her in too, but the actual plot is all about the redemption of a girl who has been abused and over worked.  She is individualistic and independent.  She learns to let others into her world—and that is the ultimate tale in Anne of Green Gables, she lets others into the worlds of her imagination.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Protagonist and Individualistic

11 February 2019, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

The most important scene is the initial scene, but the protagonist is always the focus of this scene and the novel.  Let’s start with the protagonist.  What makes a great protagonist?  Here is a list.

 

  1. Normal person (not wealthy, noble, or privileged)
  2. Loves to read
  3. Loves to learn
  4. Unique skill(s), power(s) and/or learning
  5. Pathos (poor, homeless, abused, friendless, ill)
  6. Individualistic and independent
  7. Introspective
  8. Leader
  9. Naturally good
  10. Rejection of the urban
  11. Rejection of the modern
  12. Appeal to the imagination

 

In the Modern Era and specifically in the Romantic Era, the protagonist is driven by individualism.  What does this mean?

 

The protagonist is an individual and individualistic because they have a reason to be individualistic.  The reason is always because of their unique skill(s), power(s), or learning.  As we described before, the modern (romantic) protagonist has skills, powers, or learning.  This is what makes them individualistic and powerful.  This is what drives them.  For example, my protagonist Lilly from Lilly: Enchantment and the Computer, is a math and computer genius.  Her individualism and the little power she has derives directly from these skills.  I write little power because, other than her math and programming, she may be one of the most hapless people around.  She is homeless, abused, hungry, poor, socially inept, unloved, and friendless.

 

All of these problems slowly become solved, but not just through her skills, however to a degree because of her skills.  The skills, powers, and learning of the protagonist make them individualistic and drives their independence.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment