Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Entertainment, Protagonists and Quirks

14 July 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too.

 

So, just what is entertaining and how do we make writing entertaining?  These are two very completely different questions.  What is entertaining, is a whole set of ideas and other questions.  Entertaining is based on age, interests, ideas, intellect, and education.  Let’s settle on some specifics just to help clarify and focus the discussion.

 

Then what is entertaining?  If we know what makes something entertaining, we can repeat that formula and make everything entertaining.  This is what I’ve been trying to express through studying about creativity, characters, protagonists, scenes, tension and release, and all.  Each of these are elements of the whole—the goal being entertainment.  Some simple books are easy to pull apart to evaluate for their entertainment, novels aren’t very easy to deconstruct entirely for entertainment.  But we can.  Let’s look at the children’s book I Want My Hat Back.

 

In I Want My Hat Back, the bear has lost his hat.  He asks each animal he meets about his hat.  On the way, the rabbit is wearing a red hat and seems suspicious.  The bear continues until he’s tired.  He remembers seeing a red hat like his, and he returns to the rabbit to claim his hat.  In the end, the rabbit is missing and the bear has his red hat.  That’s a pretty simple story.  What makes it so entertaining?  If you haven’t read this book before, check it out of your library or go to Amazon Prime and see the book read for you.  What did we learn from this kid’s book?

 

  1. Protagonist
  2. Telic flaw
  3. Settings
  4. Characters
  5. Simple
  6. Sequential
  7. Well developed
  8. Antagonist
  9. Complete

 

The first step in entertainment is this—our protagonists should not do anything that our readers would find disagreeable.  In fact, our protagonists can’t do anything our readers find disagreeable.

 

Protagonists need quirks.  I mentioned about tags for protagonists and characters.  This moves to quirks.  The best protagonists aren’t necessarily filled with quirks, but quirks and characters are memorable.  Let me write, we don’t want quirky protagonists, but protagonists with quirks are great—what’s the difference.

 

You probably won’t forget a quirky protagonist.  I have a couple of quirky protagonist’s the whole point of my novels for these protagonists is to make them more and more like normal humanity.  This works.  This is a telic flaw, a plot, and a theme.  Let’s see.  For example, Anne of Green Gables is a quirky protagonist, and Sara Crew is a quirky protagonist.  They are slightly strange girls, but they are lovable protagonists.  Their quirks aren’t very great, but they are great, and their quirks make them lovable and special.  Both of them have similar quirky personalities—they both love to make up stories and they both have fantasy lives which they relate to the other girls.  Now, some of you will say that this is the normal mind of the imaginative child—so perhaps these aren’t that great of quirks, but the authors of these novels do present them as quirks.

 

I have some similar protagonists mostly Shiggy and Essie.  They are quirky and they are special in some ways.  What about these quirks.  Normal quirks could be fantasy and imagination like Sara and Anne.  Or what quirks might be normal and interesting for a protagonist.  This is a great question:  what quirks are great quirks and what are not great quirks?

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Entertainment, Protagonists aren’t Real

13 July 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too.

 

So, just what is entertaining and how do we make writing entertaining?  These are two very completely different questions.  What is entertaining, is a whole set of ideas and other questions.  Entertaining is based on age, interests, ideas, intellect, and education.  Let’s settle on some specifics just to help clarify and focus the discussion.

 

Then what is entertaining?  If we know what makes something entertaining, we can repeat that formula and make everything entertaining.  This is what I’ve been trying to express through studying about creativity, characters, protagonists, scenes, tension and release, and all.  Each of these are elements of the whole—the goal being entertainment.  Some simple books are easy to pull apart to evaluate for their entertainment, novels aren’t very easy to deconstruct entirely for entertainment.  But we can.  Let’s look at the children’s book I Want My Hat Back.

 

In I Want My Hat Back, the bear has lost his hat.  He asks each animal he meets about his hat.  On the way, the rabbit is wearing a red hat and seems suspicious.  The bear continues until he’s tired.  He remembers seeing a red hat like his, and he returns to the rabbit to claim his hat.  In the end, the rabbit is missing and the bear has his red hat.  That’s a pretty simple story.  What makes it so entertaining?  If you haven’t read this book before, check it out of your library or go to Amazon Prime and see the book read for you.  What did we learn from this kid’s book?

 

  1. Protagonist
  2. Telic flaw
  3. Settings
  4. Characters
  5. Simple
  6. Sequential
  7. Well developed
  8. Antagonist
  9. Complete

 

The first step in entertainment is this—our protagonists should not do anything that our readers would find disagreeable.  In fact, our protagonists can’t do anything our readers find disagreeable.

 

Protagonists are like dialog in a novel or play.  Not dialog in a novel or play resembles in any way real dialog.  Do I need to explain this again?  Real dialog is encompassed by filler words, incomplete sentences, bad grammar, idioms, off-track comments and ideas.  Dialog in a novel or play might have some small touches of this, but your editor will definitely make you clean up your dialog to the point that it isn’t close to real.  There will be little bad grammar, few incomplete sentences, nearly zero filler words, nothing or little off-track.  In other words, even if you write “real” dialog, no one will want it or believe it.

 

Protagonists are the same way.  It’s become popular in some writing to express “real” protagonists, but who wants a “real” protagonist filled with real human fears, problems, and desires.  A few touches of humanity are appropriate, but readers aren’t looking for “real” people, they want archetypes of people.  They want examples of what they would like to be.  They want protagonists and characters who entertain them.  This is very different from the “real” person.  Admittedly, some people are consistently entertaining, but few are always entertaining.  Real people sleep.  Real people have foibles that prevent them from reaching their true potential.  Protagonists have foibles that make them entertaining.  That’s the points after all.  All the characteristics of a protagonist must be entertaining.  If they have a foible or a bad habit, that must make them more entertaining.  Thus, when we develop a protagonist, every characteristic of that protagonist needs to make that protagonist more entertaining not less entertaining.  For example, I have a character Natana who is always pushing the hair out of her eyes.  It is a characteristic of this character.  Its intent is to add an entertaining quirk to her.  It is also a tag.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Entertainment and Real Protagonists

12 July 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too.

 

So, just what is entertaining and how do we make writing entertaining?  These are two very completely different questions.  What is entertaining, is a whole set of ideas and other questions.  Entertaining is based on age, interests, ideas, intellect, and education.  Let’s settle on some specifics just to help clarify and focus the discussion.

 

Then what is entertaining?  If we know what makes something entertaining, we can repeat that formula and make everything entertaining.  This is what I’ve been trying to express through studying about creativity, characters, protagonists, scenes, tension and release, and all.  Each of these are elements of the whole—the goal being entertainment.  Some simple books are easy to pull apart to evaluate for their entertainment, novels aren’t very easy to deconstruct entirely for entertainment.  But we can.  Let’s look at the children’s book I Want My Hat Back.

 

In I Want My Hat Back, the bear has lost his hat.  He asks each animal he meets about his hat.  On the way, the rabbit is wearing a red hat and seems suspicious.  The bear continues until he’s tired.  He remembers seeing a red hat like his, and he returns to the rabbit to claim his hat.  In the end, the rabbit is missing and the bear has his red hat.  That’s a pretty simple story.  What makes it so entertaining?  If you haven’t read this book before, check it out of your library or go to Amazon Prime and see the book read for you.  What did we learn from this kid’s book?

 

  1. Protagonist
  2. Telic flaw
  3. Settings
  4. Characters
  5. Simple
  6. Sequential
  7. Well developed
  8. Antagonist
  9. Complete

 

The first step in entertainment is this—our protagonists should not do anything that our readers would find disagreeable.  In fact, our protagonists can’t do anything our readers find disagreeable.

 

What makes a great protagonist?  I’ve asked this question over and over.  Here’s some new perspective.  I have mentioned this before.  The real makes terrible protagonists.  Most people aren’t good protagonists.  Novels aren’t about the real—they are about entertainingly revealing the protagonist.  If you want real, read an autobiography or a biography.  I’ve never heard anyone say, “That biography or autobiography was just like a great novel.”  Novels aren’t lies, but they are all about entertainment.  Autobiographies and biographies are not about entertainment, that’s a good characteristic, but they are about passing on history and knowledge.  Caesar didn’t write about himself to entertain you.  He wrote to record his exploits and thoughts in history.  He is telling.

 

We are fiction authors, we don’t tell, we show.  Fiction is all about entertainment and about showing.  Now, you can take a bigger than life person from the world and make them even more entertaining and exciting.  That’s usually not what we do.  I wrote a novel that included Jesus Christ, but Jesus wasn’t my protagonist.  Instead of Jesus, I chose, his killer, Centurion Adenadar.  My job, as a writer, was to make Centurion Abenadar’s life and revelation of his life an entertaining as possible.  I took a little known person from history and made him an entertaining part of this history.  Where Centurion Abenadar was just a footnote, I made him a protagonist and the center of a novel.  This is just what we are about.  How do we pick such a person?  Or how do we make them up?

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Entertainment and the Irrational

11 July 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too.

 

So, just what is entertaining and how do we make writing entertaining?  These are two very completely different questions.  What is entertaining, is a whole set of ideas and other questions.  Entertaining is based on age, interests, ideas, intellect, and education.  Let’s settle on some specifics just to help clarify and focus the discussion.

 

Then what is entertaining?  If we know what makes something entertaining, we can repeat that formula and make everything entertaining.  This is what I’ve been trying to express through studying about creativity, characters, protagonists, scenes, tension and release, and all.  Each of these are elements of the whole—the goal being entertainment.  Some simple books are easy to pull apart to evaluate for their entertainment, novels aren’t very easy to deconstruct entirely for entertainment.  But we can.  Let’s look at the children’s book I Want My Hat Back.

 

In I Want My Hat Back, the bear has lost his hat.  He asks each animal he meets about his hat.  On the way, the rabbit is wearing a red hat and seems suspicious.  The bear continues until he’s tired.  He remembers seeing a red hat like his, and he returns to the rabbit to claim his hat.  In the end, the rabbit is missing and the bear has his red hat.  That’s a pretty simple story.  What makes it so entertaining?  If you haven’t read this book before, check it out of your library or go to Amazon Prime and see the book read for you.  What did we learn from this kid’s book?

 

  1. Protagonist
  2. Telic flaw
  3. Settings
  4. Characters
  5. Simple
  6. Sequential
  7. Well developed
  8. Antagonist
  9. Complete

 

The first step in entertainment is this—our protagonists should not do anything that our readers would find disagreeable.  In fact, our protagonists can’t do anything our readers find disagreeable.

 

I am writing about the suspension of disbelief and the protagonist.  The question is how do we ensure our protagonist doesn’t cause breaking the suspension of disbelief?

 

Illogical and irrational actions or responses by protagonists are one of my biggest complaints in modern literature.  On the one hand, you have protagonists who are unable to pull the trigger, on the other, you have protagonists who can’t seem to act as if they are human.   This is the Marvel Universe by the way.  All of the godlike heroes are killing humans left and right without a single care, but if a single one of the beautiful superpeople break a nail, the cosmos is in danger and they murder a whole bunch more.  I’m not sure who writes this stuff, but it’s not likely a human being.

 

What would you do?  Or better, what would your protagonist do.  I hope you don’t have a psychotic serial murder for a protagonist.  Let me give you a hint, a psychotic serial killer is an antagonist and not a good protagonist.  Unless you are writing for the mentally ill, you need to promote, project, and provide your readers with a protagonist whom your readers will love.  It’s really hard to love a serial killer, unless they are a superhero.

 

I don’t even like the concept of wrapping a really dangerous and godlike person in a human wrapper.  Now, give me a significantly limited person who might possess special skills—I’ll go for that.  That’s what I write about all the time.  Godlike serial killers are bad protagonists even if they are messiahs or superheroes.  Witches who can do some pretty cool stuff, but who are conflicted about their actions and certainly wouldn’t harm a good person sounds like a fun protagonist to me.  So, what would you do?

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Entertainment and a Friend Protagonist, Not

10 July 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too.

 

So, just what is entertaining and how do we make writing entertaining?  These are two very completely different questions.  What is entertaining, is a whole set of ideas and other questions.  Entertaining is based on age, interests, ideas, intellect, and education.  Let’s settle on some specifics just to help clarify and focus the discussion.

 

Then what is entertaining?  If we know what makes something entertaining, we can repeat that formula and make everything entertaining.  This is what I’ve been trying to express through studying about creativity, characters, protagonists, scenes, tension and release, and all.  Each of these are elements of the whole—the goal being entertainment.  Some simple books are easy to pull apart to evaluate for their entertainment, novels aren’t very easy to deconstruct entirely for entertainment.  But we can.  Let’s look at the children’s book I Want My Hat Back.

 

In I Want My Hat Back, the bear has lost his hat.  He asks each animal he meets about his hat.  On the way, the rabbit is wearing a red hat and seems suspicious.  The bear continues until he’s tired.  He remembers seeing a red hat like his, and he returns to the rabbit to claim his hat.  In the end, the rabbit is missing and the bear has his red hat.  That’s a pretty simple story.  What makes it so entertaining?  If you haven’t read this book before, check it out of your library or go to Amazon Prime and see the book read for you.  What did we learn from this kid’s book?

 

  1. Protagonist
  2. Telic flaw
  3. Settings
  4. Characters
  5. Simple
  6. Sequential
  7. Well developed
  8. Antagonist
  9. Complete

 

The first step in entertainment is this—our protagonists should not do anything that our readers would find disagreeable.  In fact, our protagonists can’t do anything our readers find disagreeable.

 

I am writing about the suspension of disbelief and the protagonist.  The question is how do we ensure our protagonist doesn’t cause breaking the suspension of disbelief?

 

I find the irrationality of many modern characters to be stupefying.  I suspect many modern readers find this to be true too.  Characters who don’t act or whose thought patterns are completely adverse to common human ideals and human thinking are hateful to me.  What about you?

 

Perhaps the most common and the most irrational are those whose authors feel like they must be forgiving and altruistic in the face of evil.  You see this especially in Asian writing and in modern young adult and sometimes adult literature.  I find in both ironic and disingenuous.  If you have an antagonist or opponents who act completely indifferent to human laws and ideals—for example, murdering children, torturing people, indiscriminant harm, mayhem, and other purely vile and inhuman actions, why would your protagonist even pause to not eliminate them?  Why would you forgive those who harm others?  I don’t get this at all.  I am a military person, and my job has been to remove enemies to my nation from this earth, but I never felt like forgiving their evil and letting them go.  I knew that they would be raping or murdering the next child they saw.  Such people are evil and bad.  In a novel, much more than the real world, justice comes in a wrapping of literature.  The author can write anything in any way they wish.  In the real world infrequent justice is still justice.  In the world of a novel, justice is justice.  The author controls it.

 

Here’s my suggestion.  If you can’t stomach justice, you shouldn’t set up the situation in the first place.  This is almost like a Chekov’s Gun.  If you create a vile inhuman character who rapes and murders women and children, you have already created a circumstance that demands justice.  If your protagonist balks in applying that justice, I think you have destroyed the point of your situation and plot.  Likewise if you set up any other illogical ending.  I’ll get to that next.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Entertainment and a Friend Protagonist, Generally

9 July 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too.

 

So, just what is entertaining and how do we make writing entertaining?  These are two very completely different questions.  What is entertaining, is a whole set of ideas and other questions.  Entertaining is based on age, interests, ideas, intellect, and education.  Let’s settle on some specifics just to help clarify and focus the discussion.

 

Then what is entertaining?  If we know what makes something entertaining, we can repeat that formula and make everything entertaining.  This is what I’ve been trying to express through studying about creativity, characters, protagonists, scenes, tension and release, and all.  Each of these are elements of the whole—the goal being entertainment.  Some simple books are easy to pull apart to evaluate for their entertainment, novels aren’t very easy to deconstruct entirely for entertainment.  But we can.  Let’s look at the children’s book I Want My Hat Back.

 

In I Want My Hat Back, the bear has lost his hat.  He asks each animal he meets about his hat.  On the way, the rabbit is wearing a red hat and seems suspicious.  The bear continues until he’s tired.  He remembers seeing a red hat like his, and he returns to the rabbit to claim his hat.  In the end, the rabbit is missing and the bear has his red hat.  That’s a pretty simple story.  What makes it so entertaining?  If you haven’t read this book before, check it out of your library or go to Amazon Prime and see the book read for you.  What did we learn from this kid’s book?

 

  1. Protagonist
  2. Telic flaw
  3. Settings
  4. Characters
  5. Simple
  6. Sequential
  7. Well developed
  8. Antagonist
  9. Complete

 

The first step in entertainment is this—our protagonists should not do anything that our readers would find disagreeable.  In fact, our protagonists can’t do anything our readers find disagreeable.

 

I am writing about the suspension of disbelief and the protagonist.  The question is how do we ensure our protagonist doesn’t cause breaking the suspension of disbelief?

 

What I was getting to yesterday is that the protagonist should have characteristic similar to a friend.  I then suggested the best example from my writing of a really flawed character who is still very likable is Shiggy.

 

Maybe not everyone would have Shiggy as their friend.  This goes back to what I’ve written about protagonists and readers.  Readers don’t really want to be like protagonists, not externally, and usually not internally.  What they want is to be able to trust the protagonist.

 

Perhaps the worst thing a friend can do is something completely out of character or unexpected.  The unexpected that is in character is okay, but the unexpected that is out of character is not okay.  Let’s say you have a friend who gives you gentle punches all the time.  If they suddenly give you a hard punch because you do something stupid, that’s in character.  On the other hand, if a friend suddenly belts you out of the blue, that’s likely the end of the relationship.

 

Protagonists are the same.  We expect certain behaviors from them.  As long as they stay in their lanes, we go along with them.  If they stray too far there is the breaking of the suspension of disbelief.  As I mentioned, perhaps the most powerful characteristic of any protagonist is rational thought and rational response.  This is always an issue with the suspension of disbelief.  When a character acts irrationally, that really bothers me as a reader.  I find my mind wandering and the suspension of disbelief is done.  As I noted, I want my protagonists to be likeable.  They are like friends.  Their every characteristic doesn’t have to be friendly or even nice, but I expect them to remain in character and to act rationally.  I also expect them to make the decisions I would make.  In fact, I find the irrationality of many modern characters to be stupefying.  I suspect many modern readers find this to be true too.  Let’s look at this.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Entertainment and a Friend Protagonist, Shiggy

8 July 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too.

 

So, just what is entertaining and how do we make writing entertaining?  These are two very completely different questions.  What is entertaining, is a whole set of ideas and other questions.  Entertaining is based on age, interests, ideas, intellect, and education.  Let’s settle on some specifics just to help clarify and focus the discussion.

 

Then what is entertaining?  If we know what makes something entertaining, we can repeat that formula and make everything entertaining.  This is what I’ve been trying to express through studying about creativity, characters, protagonists, scenes, tension and release, and all.  Each of these are elements of the whole—the goal being entertainment.  Some simple books are easy to pull apart to evaluate for their entertainment, novels aren’t very easy to deconstruct entirely for entertainment.  But we can.  Let’s look at the children’s book I Want My Hat Back.

 

In I Want My Hat Back, the bear has lost his hat.  He asks each animal he meets about his hat.  On the way, the rabbit is wearing a red hat and seems suspicious.  The bear continues until he’s tired.  He remembers seeing a red hat like his, and he returns to the rabbit to claim his hat.  In the end, the rabbit is missing and the bear has his red hat.  That’s a pretty simple story.  What makes it so entertaining?  If you haven’t read this book before, check it out of your library or go to Amazon Prime and see the book read for you.  What did we learn from this kid’s book?

 

  1. Protagonist
  2. Telic flaw
  3. Settings
  4. Characters
  5. Simple
  6. Sequential
  7. Well developed
  8. Antagonist
  9. Complete

 

The first step in entertainment is this—our protagonists should not do anything that our readers would find disagreeable.  In fact, our protagonists can’t do anything our readers find disagreeable.

 

I am writing about the suspension of disbelief and the protagonist.  The question is how do we ensure our protagonist doesn’t cause breaking the suspension of disbelief?

 

What I was getting to yesterday is that the protagonist should have characteristic similar to a friend.  I then suggested the best example from my writing of a really flawed character who is still very likable is Shiggy.  Let me tell you about Shiggy.

 

Shiggy is that person who always screws up.  You wouldn’t mind her out on a date or on an outing, but she might be a dangerous person at work.  Shiggy is like a huge proportion of many of the people you find today: high self-esteem, low common sense, socially inept, culturally inept, and not very clear on the concepts of the world.  Like I mentioned, she is like many people you might work with or know today.

 

She’s the kind of person you might like to help, but she’s hard to tell anything to.  Most people would really like to help Shiggy especially if she wants help.  This is the approach of the novel.  The point is the education of Shiggy.  Shiggy is a person in transition.  She really is put upon.  She really is trying hard, but her problems are always Shiggy.  I don’t know about you, but I find this kind of person to be very pleasant.  In a business or professional environment, I might watch her closely, but what new, young, or inexperienced person doesn’t need training, mentoring, and help.  Your age, experience, and wisdom really determines how you think about Shiggy.  You might want to help her, teach her, train her, mentor her, date her, or just have drinks with her.  The point is that Shiggy is a work in progress.  Most people are a work in progress, and in this novel Shiggy is a person who is being developed.  This makes the novel a discovery and learning novel.  I love these types of novels and these types of characters.  More about friendship, next.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Entertainment and a Friend Protagonist

7 July 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too.

 

So, just what is entertaining and how do we make writing entertaining?  These are two very completely different questions.  What is entertaining, is a whole set of ideas and other questions.  Entertaining is based on age, interests, ideas, intellect, and education.  Let’s settle on some specifics just to help clarify and focus the discussion.

 

Then what is entertaining?  If we know what makes something entertaining, we can repeat that formula and make everything entertaining.  This is what I’ve been trying to express through studying about creativity, characters, protagonists, scenes, tension and release, and all.  Each of these are elements of the whole—the goal being entertainment.  Some simple books are easy to pull apart to evaluate for their entertainment, novels aren’t very easy to deconstruct entirely for entertainment.  But we can.  Let’s look at the children’s book I Want My Hat Back.

 

In I Want My Hat Back, the bear has lost his hat.  He asks each animal he meets about his hat.  On the way, the rabbit is wearing a red hat and seems suspicious.  The bear continues until he’s tired.  He remembers seeing a red hat like his, and he returns to the rabbit to claim his hat.  In the end, the rabbit is missing and the bear has his red hat.  That’s a pretty simple story.  What makes it so entertaining?  If you haven’t read this book before, check it out of your library or go to Amazon Prime and see the book read for you.  What did we learn from this kid’s book?

 

  1. Protagonist
  2. Telic flaw
  3. Settings
  4. Characters
  5. Simple
  6. Sequential
  7. Well developed
  8. Antagonist
  9. Complete

 

The first step in entertainment is this—our protagonists should not do anything that our readers would find disagreeable.  In fact, our protagonists can’t do anything our readers find disagreeable.

 

I am writing about the suspension of disbelief and the protagonist.  The question is how do we ensure our protagonist doesn’t cause breaking the suspension of disbelief?  I’ve written that it is critical that your reader likes and agrees with the protagonist.  This doesn’t mean your protagonist must be a wimp or weak.  You can have strong protagonists with definite and overreaching opinions—it depends on your writing skill and your presentation of the protagonist.  Just like a friend, you can have a protagonist that readers like but would never really want to be or have as an actual friend.  What can this mean?

 

I wrote before that readers don’t really want to necessarily be your protagonist.  They want to bask in the reality of your protagonist.  They want to imagine they are your protagonist, but they don’t really want to live a life like your protagonist.  In this sense, they want, in their imagination, to live in the world of your protagonist.  This is why tragedies aren’t as popular as comedies.  In a comedy, there is always scope for a positive end.  The world of the protagonist must have some positive attributes or the hope of positive attributes.  The protagonist needs to have some positive attributes your readers can latch onto.  When I write “latch onto,” this becomes a little tricky.

 

I like strong protagonists.  I want them to be opinionated, skilled, intelligent, and all, in their own way.  At the same time, I want them to be likable to my readers.  Perhaps the best example from my writing of a really flawed character who is still very likable is Shiggy.  I should write about Shiggy.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Entertainment and a Good Protagonist

6 July 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.  Happy Birthday America.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too.

 

So, just what is entertaining and how do we make writing entertaining?  These are two very completely different questions.  What is entertaining, is a whole set of ideas and other questions.  Entertaining is based on age, interests, ideas, intellect, and education.  Let’s settle on some specifics just to help clarify and focus the discussion.

 

Then what is entertaining?  If we know what makes something entertaining, we can repeat that formula and make everything entertaining.  This is what I’ve been trying to express through studying about creativity, characters, protagonists, scenes, tension and release, and all.  Each of these are elements of the whole—the goal being entertainment.  Some simple books are easy to pull apart to evaluate for their entertainment, novels aren’t very easy to deconstruct entirely for entertainment.  But we can.  Let’s look at the children’s book I Want My Hat Back.

 

In I Want My Hat Back, the bear has lost his hat.  He asks each animal he meets about his hat.  On the way, the rabbit is wearing a red hat and seems suspicious.  The bear continues until he’s tired.  He remembers seeing a red hat like his, and he returns to the rabbit to claim his hat.  In the end, the rabbit is missing and the bear has his red hat.  That’s a pretty simple story.  What makes it so entertaining?  If you haven’t read this book before, check it out of your library or go to Amazon Prime and see the book read for you.  What did we learn from this kid’s book?

 

  1. Protagonist
  2. Telic flaw
  3. Settings
  4. Characters
  5. Simple
  6. Sequential
  7. Well developed
  8. Antagonist
  9. Complete

 

The first step in entertainment is this—our protagonists should not do anything that our readers would find disagreeable.  In fact, our protagonists can’t do anything our readers find disagreeable.

 

The moment a protagonist does something, anything our reader does not agree with, we have first of all destroyed the suspension of disbelief.  If bad grammar, a misspelling, or a misplaced word will drop the reader out of the suspension of disbelief, what do you think a rogue protagonist will do?  When I write a rogue protagonist, I don’t mean a good one.  Perhaps I should review what the suspension of disbelief is.

 

When you read, most fiction readers enter into the imaginary space of the novel.  They see the novel plying out in their mind.  The see the characters interacting and the world on the stage of the novel.  They hear the birds singing, the smells in the scenes, the people, they hear the words, and the do vicariously live in the world of the novel.  Notice, I say they live vicariously in the world of the novel.  They don’t necessarily live through the protagonist, but they do see the world through the protagonist.  In any case, the reader sees, hears, feels, smells, and tastes the world of the novel in his or her imagination.  The goal of the author and the novel is to hold the reader in this suspension of disbelief.  This is the point of all great writing.  This is what fiction writing is all about—the suspension of disbelief.

 

I’ve written before what factors will break or push a reader out of the suspension of disbelief.  This is one of the chief reasons we want our writing to be clear, concise, and correct.  We don’t want to push the reader out of the suspension of disbelief.  Most specifically, we don’t want the reader to put down the novel before the end.  This isn’t always possible, but it’s a goal.  The suspension of disbelief is very strong in a well written novel that shows and doesn’t tell.  It is very strong as long as the reader likes and agrees with the protagonist.  If that isn’t true, you might have a problem.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Entertainment and Protagonist

5 July 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  Back in Wichita.  Happy Birthday America.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

I completed an entire section about showing and not telling.  Remember show and don’t tell.  That makes me feel better.  At the moment, I’ve personally been focusing on writing a very complex non-fiction book length work, finding a publisher for my novels, and trying to write cohesively about showing instead of telling.  I think I have this part down well in my novels, and I’m constantly trying to discover ways to help others figure this out too.

 

So, just what is entertaining and how do we make writing entertaining?  These are two very completely different questions.  What is entertaining, is a whole set of ideas and other questions.  Entertaining is based on age, interests, ideas, intellect, and education.  Let’s settle on some specifics just to help clarify and focus the discussion.

 

Then what is entertaining?  If we know what makes something entertaining, we can repeat that formula and make everything entertaining.  This is what I’ve been trying to express through studying about creativity, characters, protagonists, scenes, tension and release, and all.  Each of these are elements of the whole—the goal being entertainment.  Some simple books are easy to pull apart to evaluate for their entertainment, novels aren’t very easy to deconstruct entirely for entertainment.  But we can.  Let’s look at the children’s book I Want My Hat Back.

 

In I Want My Hat Back, the bear has lost his hat.  He asks each animal he meets about his hat.  On the way, the rabbit is wearing a red hat and seems suspicious.  The bear continues until he’s tired.  He remembers seeing a red hat like his, and he returns to the rabbit to claim his hat.  In the end, the rabbit is missing and the bear has his red hat.  That’s a pretty simple story.  What makes it so entertaining?  If you haven’t read this book before, check it out of your library or go to Amazon Prime and see the book read for you.  What did we learn from this kid’s book?

 

  1. Protagonist
  2. Telic flaw
  3. Settings
  4. Characters
  5. Simple
  6. Sequential
  7. Well developed
  8. Antagonist
  9. Complete

 

What do we see in the bear as a protagonist that helps us write an entertaining novel.  We noted that the protagonist for the kid’s book was entertaining, but can we take these ideas and bring them to our fiction?  This is a very important question.  I go for entertaining protagonists.  In fact, I think the protagonist is the most important part of any novel.  A good or great protagonist will write your novel, and I’m not kidding, but what really makes a protagonist entertaining?

 

There are many types of protagonists.  I go for Romantic protagonists who are likeable and who most specifically make decisions the reader agrees with.  This is my mantra for entertaining protagonists.  I guess I should go back over this and tie this to the bear.

 

The bear is a big, happy, simple, cutely drawn, and unassuming bear.  He isn’t very bright, but he is determined and we like him.  He looks cute, and he acts cute.  He’s looking for his hat.

 

It’s really difficult to define the bear in terms of decisions.  He doesn’t make many, but the ones he does make, we agree with.  We like the bear and nothing the bear does makes us unhappy or discontent with him.  Perhaps, this is the best way to begin.  We aren’t ever discontent with the bear.  I suspect that some parents or some people might be angry or upset with the bear for doing whatever he did to the rabbit, but we really don’t know what happened to the rabbit.  We do know that whatever happened to the rabbit the rabbit deserved.  So, if we stand by the point that most people and especially children all agree with the bear and his actions, we have made the point that the bear hasn’t made a decision we didn’t like.  We agree with the bear’s actions and his decisions.  Now, we might not have done exactly what the bear did.  We might not want to be bears, in the woods, looking for our hat, but we agree with what the bear did, and more importantly, we don’t find the bear’s actions disagreeable.  This is the first step in entertainment.  Our protagonists should not do anything that our readers would find disagreeable.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment