Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Novel Length Ideas, Revelation

4 April 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Kansas.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

When I was writing about creativity before, the following is what I concluded.  I thought that this was such a great conclusion that I retained it in the notes above.  Let me repeat it again:

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

 

So, with an idea for a new character, a Bean-Tighe, with a description, and a connection to the novel—the protagonist’s helper, I can move forward with how to introduce this character into the novel.

 

I am talking about revelation.  The entire purpose for introducing any character at all into a novel is to, number one, provide entertainment.  Meanwhile, that character must provide, a revelation to the plot—that is the telic flaw resolution must depend on the introduction of the character.  Third, the character must provide revelation of the protagonist.

 

There we go.  I intend, this new character, Da, to be entertaining.  I’m not sure how a Fae being tied to one of the major characters can’t be entertaining, but that’s just my nature.  I intend for Da to help provide the revelation of the protagonist.  I wrote before that Sorcha is the intended protagonist of this novel, but the telic flaw is shared by both Deirdre and Sorcha.

 

Finally, the telic flaw resolution will depend on Da to one degree or another.  What I intend in this novel is to provide a situation that requires Da, Cassandra, Gisselle, Angélique, Deirdre, Sorcha, Laura, and Elodie to resolve.  I’m working on it.  I’m looking at a demon.

 

A demon would tie Angélique as well as the rest into the climax and the resolution.  Properly, Sorcha needs to be the center of the resolution of the telic flaw and the novel, but we shall see how that might work out.  In any case, Da is a fun character to introduce and draws purpose and power as well as entertainment from being part of the novel and group of girls.

 

The next point, as I mentioned, is to move from the initial scene to the next scene.  We’ll get more to this.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Novel Length Ideas, Character Purpose

3 April 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Kansas.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

When I was writing about creativity before, the following is what I concluded.  I thought that this was such a great conclusion that I retained it in the notes above.  Let me repeat it again:

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

 

So, with an idea for a new character, a Bean-Tighe, with a description, and a connection to the novel—the protagonist’s helper, I can move forward with how to introduce this character into the novel.

 

I introduced Da the Bean-Tighe as a character into my novel.  This is all and good and I tried to show you how I brought the character in, and how I expressed the character.  There is always much more to this.  What I thought might be of interest is why bring in this character and this type of character?

 

First of all, why bring in this character?  If you happen to notice, I am connecting different parts of the reflected world to the real world.  Mainly, I consider this entertaining and I hope my readers find it entertaining.  I brought in El and Laura first to connect Sorcha and Deirdre into the real world of Briton.  Their connections make linkages through the government, civil, and commercial world they all live within.

 

Next, Angélique directly interjects the world of the Fae into Sorcha and Deirdre’s lives.  This also gives the reader a direct connection and view into the world of the Fae—the reflected worldview of the novel.

 

Next, Gisselle shows another view of the reflected or supernatural world in the novel.  Gisselle also provides a connection to an entirely different world than the Fae, but a supernatural one none-the-less.

 

Cassandra brings in an entirely new view.  Here is a person who is somehow connected to the world of the Fae and to the human world, but whose legacy was stolen for some purpose.  That stolen legacy is one of the great secrets in the novel.

 

Finally, Da directly connects the human or real world with the supernatural world of the Fae as well as the supernatural world of Gisselle.  Da is really the key that lets El and Laura see the world that Cassandra, Gisselle, and Angélique represent, but that they can’t really see.  There is more.

 

The next point, as I mentioned, is to move from the initial scene to the next scene.  We’ll get more to this.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Novel Length Ideas, Release

2 April 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Kansas.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

When I was writing about creativity before, the following is what I concluded.  I thought that this was such a great conclusion that I retained it in the notes above.  Let me repeat it again:

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

 

So, with an idea for a new character, a Bean-Tighe, with a description, and a connection to the novel—the protagonist’s helper, I can move forward with how to introduce this character into the novel.

 

I’m giving you pieces of this scene as an example of a reflected worldview character introduction.  It can be looked at as an example of the introduction of any character into a novel.  I’m expressing it as the example of a reflected worldview concept because that allows me to show connections and revelations that wouldn’t exist in a real or created worldview character as well as the means of showing instead of telling.

 

As I continue the example, notice especially how the dialog and actions of the fairy Iris give us much more information about the new character, Da.

 

The darkness in the cellar changed immediately.  Deirdre could see around her as though her eyes suddenly adjusted to the light.  Down through the broken cellar door flew Iris.  The moment Iris’ eyes lit on Da, she stopped.  Da raised her hand and Iris flinched.

Deirdre grabbed Da’s free hand, “Please don’t.  Iris is a friend of my friend.  She means you and me no harm.”

Iris stuck out her chest, “My mistress and my frollick would have made mincemeat of you, Bean-Tighe.”

“Bean-Tighe?”  Deirdre looked more closely at Da, “So you are a Bean-Tighe.  I thought they looked older.”

Da smiled, “We must all start somewhere.  Most of my kin do look ancient, but I am a young creature only hundreds of years old with only a single family that I served before.”

Iris flipped her hand, “All that is true.  It is an inexperienced and young beast.  Ugly and naked too.”

Da stuck out her own thin chest, “Not naked.  My mistress has graced me with a coat.  It is my coat and a gift.  What has your mistress given you?”

Iris ignored Da.  She turned her glance to Deirdre, “What did you do you foolish child of Eve.  You have gifted some clothing to a simple house fairy.  Do you know what you have done?”

Deirdre shrugged her shoulders, “Been kind to a Fae?”

Iris swooped closer, “No, you have bound this creature to you and your household forever.”

Deirdre didn’t seem concerned, “That really doesn’t matter to me.”

“We shall see.”  Iris rose up and flitted back through the broken trap door.

In this we learn the kind of Fae creature Da is.  We also see where Da stands in power and the Fae kingdom.  Notice Iris’ actions and response.  The Fae are proud and fickle.  We know this from myth and I explain it through showing in the entire novel.  The dialog and the reactions of both Da and Iris show much more than what is expressed in words.  As I write in my rule 4 and 4a:

 

  1. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

 

If you tell everything, there are no secrets to be reveled, plus readers love to create through their imagination the world you are developing for them.  Most of the imaginative process is the rational use of the mind—give your readers something to chew on.  In this case, I provide ideas the reader puts in their mind to imagine and build the characters from description to dialog to actions.  These form the world the reader is imagining.  This is also the world the writer is imagining.  The deeper, more colorful, and more imaginative the world of the writer and writing, the deeper, more colorful, and more imaginative the world of the reader.

 

The next point, as I mentioned, is to move from the initial scene to the next scene.  We’ll get more to this.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Novel Length Ideas, Release

1 April 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Kansas.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

When I was writing about creativity before, the following is what I concluded.  I thought that this was such a great conclusion that I retained it in the notes above.  Let me repeat it again:

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

 

So, with an idea for a new character, a Bean-Tighe, with a description, and a connection to the novel—the protagonist’s helper, I can move forward with how to introduce this character into the novel.

 

I’ve included more of the conversation moving from the tension to the release in the scene.

 

Deirdre stepped up to the girl.  She watched and moved carefully.  She placed her coat on the girl’s shoulders.  The moment the coat touched her body, there was a blaze of golden light all around them.  Deirdre felt warmth course through her body.  The hairs on the back of her neck stood up.  Though she stood in a cold cellar, she felt suddenly warm and safe.

The girl put her hands over her face and began to sob, “You are so kind to me.  You are my mistress and my family.  You will give me a place.  Where you are, I am.”  She smiled between her tears, “My name is Glenda it means clean and good, but I’m allowed only one syllable so you should call me Glen or Da.  Now, you must tell me your name, mistress.”

Deirdre could not stop her words.  They flowed out of her mouth as though she had suddenly lost control of her lips and tongue, “I am named Deirdre Oighrig Calloway, but you must call me Deirdre Bolang or just Deirdre.”

The girl’s eyes widened, “Calloway.  Then you must be related to The White Lady.  We are well met Deirdre Oighrig Calloway.  I shall call you mistress or Mistress Deirdre.  I shall henceforth be Glenda Calloway-Eile, for I am adopted into your household.  You must choose what you shall call me, mistress.”

“Well, Glen sounds too much like a boy’s name and you are much too beautiful to be called that, so I shall call you Da.”

The girl grabbed Deirdre’s hands, “I shall be Da for all time.  Your Da, and your servant.  Please promise to leave me much to do in your house dear mistress.”

Above them, they heard loud clomping of shoes and louder voices calling for Deirdre.

Deirdre cupped her hands and responded, “I’m down here in the cellar.”

Da turned and put her arms around Deirdre.  Her grasp was strong, but also gentle, Deirdre barely felt her touch.  Da smiled she put her hand in Deirdre’s and made a sign with the other, “I shall let the world run apace, and the darkness and silence be natural again.”

The darkness in the cellar changed immediately.  Deirdre could see around her as though her eyes suddenly adjusted to the light.  Down through the broken cellar door flew Iris.  The moment Iris’ eyes lit on Da, she stopped.  Da raised her hand and Iris flinched.

If you didn’t know, a gift is a big deal to the Fae—at least in myth.  Further, naming I all societies and cultures is important.  There is a large amount of data in these few sentences of conversation that I don’t expand on or draw out.  I do further and later in the novel.  These are so-called secrets that I as an author develop and use through the rest of the novel.  Some are obvious and some are not so obvious.  The naming tells anyone who knows about Deirdre or about Da their relationship and their status.  At least it tells the knowing.  This is something to be used for tension development through the rest of the novel.

 

The next point, as I mentioned, is to move from the initial scene to the next scene.  We’ll get more to this.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Novel Length Ideas, Dialog is the Means

31 March 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Kansas.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

When I was writing about creativity before, the following is what I concluded.  I thought that this was such a great conclusion that I retained it in the notes above.  Let me repeat it again:

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

 

So, with an idea for a new character, a Bean-Tighe, with a description, and a connection to the novel—the protagonist’s helper, I can move forward with how to introduce this character into the novel.

 

Here, I’ll give you more of the conversation.  The point is to express the mind of the characters in dialog.  This is how we show what is going on without telling.  Notice, there is no telling at all.  Here the girl is speaking to Deirdre.

 

The girl wailed, “I know that.  I know it is falling to ruin.  I can’t stop time, and I can’t stop the world.”

“What are you waiting for?”

“My family has gone.  I’m waiting for them.”

“Your family?”

The girl put her hands over her face, “They lived here for a long time.  I saw generations of them born and die.  I took care of them and the house.”  She trembled.

Deirdre noticed the air felt chill especially in the damp cellar, she asked, “Are you cold?  You have no clothing.”

“I’ve never had any clothing.  It hasn’t been necessary.”

“But you are cold.”

“The hearth fire has been dead for a long time, and I’m not allowed to build a fire.  It isn’t my place or my skill.”

“Would you like to come with me?”

The girl’s face turned up toward Deidre.  It held a rapturous look, “I would do anything to have a family again.”

Deirdre stuttered, “I’ve not much of a family to offer you.  What would you want?”

“Nothing except a family.  I can cook and clean.  I can’t make a fire, but I can use a fire.  I can put out a fire.”

“You are obviously Fae.”

The girl licked her lips.  He face became more evident as time went by.  Her features were small and her body petit.  Her hair was silver and her eyes were a clear blue flecked with gold.  She looked like a very young woman but barely grown.  Deidre didn’t think she appeared very dangerous.  She didn’t seem threatening.  Deirdre pulled off her coat and handed it to the girl, “You look cold.  Put this on.”

The girl stepped back, “No one has ever offered me such a gift.  It is a gift, isn’t it?”

“Very well.  I gift you this coat.  You may come with me.”

“If I come with you, and you gift me such a pleasant thing…”

Deirdre cocked her head, “You may come with me until you decide what to do.”

“What to do?  Why, you would be my family.  Will you offer me a place?”

“I’m not sure what you mean.  You may come with me.  I’ll give you my coat until I can get you something better.”

“There is nothing better,” the girl stared longingly at the coat.

Deirdre held it out, “Come on take it.  I can see you shivering.”

“You must place it on my shoulders.  I can’t take up such a gift myself.”

Deirdre warily stepped toward the girl.

The girl put up her hands, “Would you put away your cross.  It will hurt me.”

Deirdre tucked it back under her blouse, “I still have it on, so you can’t hurt me.”

“Mistress, if you promise to give me a place, I will never be able to harm you.  I’m not certain I can harm anyone on this earth.”

Deirdre stepped up to the girl.  She watched and moved carefully.  She placed her coat on the girl’s shoulders.  The moment the coat touched her body, there was a blaze of golden light all around them.  Deirdre felt warmth course through her body.  The hairs on the back of her neck stood up.  Though she stood in a cold cellar, she felt suddenly warm and safe.

 

If you haven’t guessed, giving a gift to the Fae is a big deal.  This is true in all myths about the Fae and fairies.  Usually, the Fae are the ones giving the gifts and gifts from the Fae are very dangerous.  They lead to all kinds of tragedy.

 

Further, I also have an opportunity to show you the girl through description.  There is a little omniscient telling here if you can get it.  I’ll give you more and look deeper into this.

 

The next point, as I mentioned, is to move from the initial scene to the next scene.  We’ll get more to this.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Novel Length Ideas, more Dialog and the Bean-Tighe

30 March 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Kansas.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

When I was writing about creativity before, the following is what I concluded.  I thought that this was such a great conclusion that I retained it in the notes above.  Let me repeat it again:

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

 

So, with an idea for a new character, a Bean-Tighe, with a description, and a connection to the novel—the protagonist’s helper, I can move forward with how to introduce this character into the novel.

 

In a scene like the one I have been writing and describing, we build the setting that is the buildup to the scene and finally the scene itself.  We place the character who is to interact in the scene.  We bring the new character into the scene through description and then action.  The description is part of the setting.  Finally, we bring dialog into play.  This is all part of showing.

 

Showing is what we are all about.  The point is to provide a reasoned and logical buildup to the scene.  We want our readers to be held in the suspension of disbelief and this is the way to do it.

 

The dialog is the final hit.  This allows us to show the mind of the characters.  This is the opportunity for the writer to bring out motivations, attitudes, ideas, and thoughts.  The author doesn’t tell—the author shows through dialog.

 

Thus through dialog, we discover the creature (Bean-Tighe) has been taking care of the house and waiting for her family.  We can immediately see what has happened.  This is, of course, a reflected worldview circumstance that is we have a mythical creature that is introduced into the story and plotline.  This creature has been living unknown or hidden in this old house for a long time.  The family left.  We have no idea why or when, but the creature has been taking care of the place with the expectation of their return.

 

We saw that she thought Deirdre was a returning member of the family.  Who else would come into her cellar?  Who else might see her, but this was also incorrect.  The creature just saw what she expected but not what was really happening.  There is, of course, more.

 

The next point, as I mentioned, is to move from the initial scene to the next scene.  We’ll get more to this.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing—So You Want to be a Writer, Current Novel, Novel Length Ideas, Dialog and the Bean-Tighe

29 March 2020, this blog is about writing in scenes.  I’m focusing on the tools to build scenes.  I’ll leave up the parts of a novel because I think this is an important picture for any novelist.  I’m writing about how to begin and write a novel.

  1. The initial scene
  2. The rising action scenes
  3. The climax scene
  4. The falling action scene(s)
  5. The dénouement scene(s)

 

Announcement:   I need a new publisher.  Ancient Light has been delayed due to the economy, and it may not be published.  Ancient Light includes Aegypt, Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  If you are interested in historical/suspense literature, please give my novels a try.  You can read about them at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Today’s Blog: The skill of using language comes from the ability to put together figures of speech that act as symbols in writing.

Short digression:  In Kansas.

Here are my rules of writing:

  1. Entertain your readers.
  2. Don’t confuse your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

Scene development:

Here is the beginning of the scene development method from the outline:

 

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

 

First step of writing—enjoy writing.  Writing is a chore—especially if you don’t know what you are doing, and you don’t know where you are going.  Let me help you with that.

 

I’m currently writing a novel that is a little difficult to explain.  It’s a reflected worldview novel so it includes fairy creatures, British mythical beings and gods, and a vampire.  It is an adult novel, but is set in a girl’s boarding school in Saint Malo France.  The initial scene was based on another novel titled Deidre: Enchantment and the School.

 

What I’ll do now is focus on the details of words, sentences, paragraphs, and scenes on entertainment.  I can assure you if these are right, the other parts will be too.

 

I’ve been looking at scenes and especially themes for scenes and themes for novels.  The point of all of this is entertainment.  The question now is how to develop a novel length idea—this is the ultimate question I’ve been trying to help you with.

 

Below is the question for the current novel I’m writing.

 

What would happen if a royal heir was banished from England for having a supernatural heritage and kept imprisoned in a convent was released in the modern era?

 

Here is the theme statement:

 

Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

 

You can see there are real differences between the question and the theme statement.  I really can’t show you how to write a question per se.  The question is just a question.  It’s directly related to the plot.  I can show you how to write a theme statement.

 

The theme statement sets you up to write the initial scene, but here is where real creativity must prevail.  The initial scene more than any other scene in a novel is the most important and creative.  I always start the creation of my novels, now, with an initial scene.

 

When I was writing about creativity before, the following is what I concluded.  I thought that this was such a great conclusion that I retained it in the notes above.  Let me repeat it again:

 

Creativity is the extrapolation of older ideas to form new ones or to present old ideas in a new form.  It is a reflection of something new created with ties to the history, science, and logic (the intellect).  Creativity requires consuming, thinking, and producing.

 

So, with an idea for a new character, a Bean-Tighe, with a description, and a connection to the novel—the protagonist’s helper, I can move forward with how to introduce this character into the novel.

 

I didn’t give all the setting or the action.  As the creature approaches Deirdre in the dark dank cellar, it becomes more and more obvious that she is naked.  Here is how I describe her and the events.

 

The shape began to move.  It rose up on the pallet and began to take slow steps toward Deirdre.  As it moved, Deirdre could tell, the glow came from it.  Its figure became more visible as it moved closer and closer to her.  Deidre let go of the ladder and backed against it.  She shut off her torch.

As soon as the torch went out, the figure seemed to become more visible.  It was a person or some creature that looked like a person.  It was not as tall as Deirdre and it seemed like the shape of a girl or young woman.  It was naked, and Deidre could tell it was shivering or that the glow around it trembled.

Deirdre pulled the cross from under her blouse and coat.  She held it in front of her.

 

The next step is then dialog.  Here we go:

 

The naked girl cringed slightly and stopped moving toward her, “Have you returned?  I’ve kept the kitchen clean and ready, although the house was beyond my power to protect.  Who are you?”

Deirdre cleared her dry throat, “Don’t come any closer.”

“Are you threatening me?”  She look around, “You’ve broken my door and my ladder.”

“It was an accident.  The wood is rotten.  I couldn’t help it.”

The girl covered her face, “I know the house is failing, but I have no other place to go.”

“Who are you?”

The girl got a very sly look on her face, “I am the keeper of this house.”

“It isn’t much of a house anymore.”

The girl wailed, “I know that.  I know it is falling to ruin.  I can’t stop time, and I can’t stop the world.”

“What are you waiting for?”

“My family has gone.  I’m waiting for them.”

“Your family?”

The girl put her hands over her face, “They lived here for a long time.  I saw generations of them born and die.  I took care of them and the house.”  She trembled.

 

This is just fun.  I bring Deirdre into contact with a being.  She has no idea what the being might be.  My readers likely don’t either.  Deirdre was exploring a supposedly haunted house, and she has found something haunting it.  What would you ask, and what would you say?  This is exactly what I’m trying to portray in the novel and this scene.

 

The next point, as I mentioned, is to move from the initial scene to the next scene.  We’ll get more to this.

 

The most important thing for the scene is developing the entertainment in the scene.

 

I’ll write more tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com

www.aegyptnovel.com

http://www.sisteroflight.com

http://www.sisterofdarkness.com

www.centurionnovel.com

www.thesecondmission.com

www.theendofhonor.com

www.thefoxshonor.com

www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment